It’s easier for your car to be hacked than you might think: How to protect yourself


The dashboard of the software-updated Tesla Model S P90D shows the icons enabling Tesla's autopilot, featuring limited hands-free steering. Car-hacking is more of a threat than most realise. — Chicago Tribune/TNS

Modern cars are computers on wheels, meaning hostile hackers can violate your car’s software and do what they want to it a lot more easily than you might think.

Moshe Shlisel knows exactly how someone can hack your car. Fortunately, he’s one of the good guys. His company specialises in cybersecurity. His team looks for vulnerabilities in cars to pinpoint the risks and then help to guard against them.

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