Germany's Leipzig, a Euro 2024 host city, has more to offer travellers than just football matches


A treetop walk takes visitors through Gondwanaland at Leipzig Zoo.

Leipzig is one of the host cities of this year’s UEFA European Football Championship, or Euro 2024, in Germany. Fans from everywhere, especially Portugal, the Czech Republic, France, Croatia, Italy and the Netherlands will most likely be headed to Germany to see matches (happening now till July 14).

Whether you’re in Leipzig for a game, or will just be in town during the tournament: What is there to experience from a fan’s point of view? Where can you soak up the Euro 2024 atmosphere away from the stadium? And what else is on offer besides football?

Here are some tips on what to see and do:

1. Public screenings

The fan zone will be located at Augustusplatz, Leipzig’s largest square, which is overlooked by the Leipzig Opera and the Gewandhaus concert hall.

All 51 Euro 2024 matches will be broadcast on two large screens, one measuring 84sq m and the other 21sq m. There is space for up to 15,000 people and entry is free.

The Red Bull Arena, the home stadium for RB Leipzig, is more centrally located than most other large football stadiums in Germany.The Red Bull Arena, the home stadium for RB Leipzig, is more centrally located than most other large football stadiums in Germany.

2. Stadium

The Red Bull Arena, the home stadium for RB Leipzig, is more centrally located than most other large football stadiums in Germany. From Leipzig Central Station, you can take tram lines 3, 7 and 15 to the arena in about 10 minutes. During the Euro 2024, the arena will officially be known as Leipzig Stadium.

There will be no parking spaces around the stadium during the tournament. If you are coming by car, the city council recommends using one of the five large park-and-ride car parks. These are all located on the outskirts of Leipzig, from where spectators can get a tram to the city centre or to the stadium.

3. Must-sees for football fans

If you’re arriving by train, you should check out the Stadium|Facade exhibition at Leipzig Central Station. Large-format images from photographer Jorg Dietrich put stadium architecture centre stage. The exhibition will be on display until July 3 in the basement level of the station’s shopping arcade.

Speaking of stadiums: Even if you don’t have a ticket to one of the matches, a visit to the Leipzig Stadium is worth it.

The stadium was constructed within the confines of the exterior of the historic Central Stadium. With a capacity of 100,000, it was once the largest stadium in Germany. On select days you can take a tour of the stadium.

A contrast to the modern multifunctional arena, which is home to Champions League qualifiers RB Leipzig, is the Alfred Kunze Sportpark in the west of the city. Home to the BSG Chemie Leipzig football club, founded in 1950 and two-time East German champions.

The Gewandhaus on Leipzig’s Augustusplatz square is a well-known concert hall.The Gewandhaus on Leipzig’s Augustusplatz square is a well-known concert hall.

A concrete sculpture commemorates when the team won the East German Premier League in 1964, against all the odds.

Leipzig is known for its zoo, which, like the stadium, is located centrally. The extensive complex is home to one of the most species-rich zoos in Europe. A highlight is Gondwanaland, a massive greenhouse with a treetop trail.

For football fans a visit to the zoo will be even more fun on days when Germany has matches and during the European Championship matches that will be played in Leipzig. From 5pm, visitors will be able to watch the matches on a big screen in the zoo’s concert garden, with space for up to 1,000 people.

Entry to the zoo will also be free – but you’ll have to get one of the “€0” tickets online or from the ticket office beforehand. There will also be a football-themed family programme in the concert garden, every day until July 7. It’s part of the free “Stadium of Dreams” events being organised in Euro 2024 host cities.

4. Leipzig beyond the pitch

A stroll through the city centre promises a change from football, with shops, cafes and historic buildings on every corner. One of these is the St Nicholas Church, where people began to gather in the 1980s, leading to peaceful protests against the East German government and the peaceful revolution of 1989.

Auerbach’s Cellar, a historic restaurant that has been serving people for hundreds of years, is also worth a visit. Just don’t forget to make a reservation!

The compact old town is perfect for a stroll, and everything is within walking distance of the central station.

The monument to the Battle Of Leipzig commemorates a bloody 1813 victory over Napoleon and one of Europe’s largest battles before World War I. — Photos: JAN WOITAS/dpaThe monument to the Battle Of Leipzig commemorates a bloody 1813 victory over Napoleon and one of Europe’s largest battles before World War I. — Photos: JAN WOITAS/dpa

The monument to the Battle Of Leipzig (also known as the Battle Of The Nations) is located away from Leipzig city centre. It commemorates the Battle Of Leipzig that was fought in the autumn of 1813, when Napoleon’s troops suffered a decisive defeat against an alliance of Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden.

The monument, which was inaugurated in 1913, is 91m tall and can be seen from miles around, and offers a panoramic view of Leipzig from the viewing platform. – dpa

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