Cooking is the new way Malaysians can travel amid Covid-19


If there’s any consolation at all about the pandemic, it’s that we are now finding new ways to “travel” from the comforts of our home. One of the ways to do this is by replicating food from your past travels or future trips on the bucket list. Photo: Daria Yakovleva/Pixabay

When we travel, food is every bit an important part of the experience as sightseeing and learning new cultures. In fact, it’s a major motivation for many people when planning for a holiday.

If some people joke that they live to eat, well... the idea of travelling just to eat shouldn’t come as a surprise.

Food is often a great way to learn about different cultures and heritage too. In a post dedicated to culinary adventures, travel guide book publisher Lonely Planet said that there’s an “inextricable link between food and travel”.

That link can often be very fascinating and for the most part, delicious!

“The best food in the world is often one which comes with an unforgettable memory, and what better way to experience it than on your travels?” said Lonely Planet.

For many foodies, however, Covid-19 – through border closures and travel bans – has not only halted their wanderlust, but also increased their insatiable cravings for certain dishes.

But if there’s any consolation at all about the pandemic, it’s that we are now finding new ways to “travel” from the comforts of our home.

One of the ways to do this is by replicating food from your past travels or future trips on the bucket list. You don’t even have to look far for recipe inspirations.

Malaysia is a melting pot of various cuisines, and is often voted one of the best food capitals by travel and food experts. There are many speciality recipes from the 13 states that you can try to cook in your own kitchen.

Some ideas include Sarawak’s kolo mee, Penang’s char kuey teow, Terengganu’s nasi dagang and Pahang’s gulai tempoyak ikan patin.

If you’re looking for something more international then try a risotto alla Milanese to take you back to Piazza San Marco in Milan, Italy, or an okonomiyaki just like the ones you had in Osaka, Japan.

You can also go all out and make a huge container of kimchi, so that you won’t get too misty eyed whenever you watch your favourite K-drama and reminisce the days of walking along Myeong-dong, buying cheap face masks and other beauty products.

Alternatively, you can keep it relatively simple and try to make some dishes that brought you back to carefree days of pre-pandemic travelling.

Happy cooking!
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