For students with a penchant for problem-solving


UOW Malaysia KDU has nine bachelor’s degree and diploma courses in engineering, preparing students to become effective problem-solvers for the industry.

THE old Russian problem-solving method known as theory of inventive problem-solving or TRIZ in short extols innovative thinking among its practitioners.

Large conglomerates such as Samsung found success using the methodology, which aided in the brand saving millions in its first few projects and was later dubbed the bedrock of innovation at Samsung. (¹)

That said, having a strong foundation is a successful problem-solving methodology would be highly beneficial.

Engineering students at UOW Malaysia KDU are trained using TRIZ.

“We train all our engineering students in TRIZ,” said UOW Malaysia KD, Penang School-Engineering, Computing and Built Environment head Dr Yeap Gik Hong.

But how does TRIZ aid in the development of engineering students?

According to the study entitled Effect of TRIZ on the creativity of engineering students, the authors found that this theory has a positive impact on students, threefold. (²)

The study, which zeroed in on the creativity of 121 university freshmen studying engineering, noted that the theory has a strong positive effect on a student’s ability to analyse problems, and to generate, select and execute a strategy.

It also increased the creativity of students when it came to designed products, including their ability to develop and implement novel ideas.

Furthermore, the study found that TRIZ has a positive effect on engineering students’ creative performance.

"Engineers are inherently problem-solvers. There isn't a single problem in the world that engineers won’t try and solve.”

“Utilising TRIZ, we not only instil within our engineering students the technical knowledge they need, but we also transform their thinking capabilities to become creative problem-solvers,” said UOW Malaysia KDU deputy vice chancellor and associate professor Dr Brian Imrie.

Dr Sim (far left, seated) and Tan (far right, seated) along with their engineering students each holding a copy of their TRIZ program.Dr Sim (far left, seated) and Tan (far right, seated) along with their engineering students each holding a copy of their TRIZ program.

The institute has nine bachelor’s degree and diploma courses in engineering, specialising in the varying engineering fields of electrical and electronics, mechanical or mechatronics.

Leading the way in helping UOW Malaysia KDU engineering students assimilate with the methodology is Dr Yeap, who is a certified International TRIZ Association (MATRIZ) level three practitioner and a Malaysia TRIZ Innovation Association (MyTRIZ) level three practitioner and level two instructor.

Also lending a helping hand are department head Dr Sim Hock Kheng, Head of Department and Department of Engineering senior lecturer Tan Mei Hooi. Both of them are MyTRIZ-certified level three practitioners and level two instructors.

For more information, visit www.uowmkdu.edu.my or call 03-5565 0538 or 04-238 6368.

Reference:

  1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2013/03/07/why-is-samsung-such-an-innovative-company/?sh=6cc6c89b2ad7

  2. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1871187115300298

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