China's Hubei province to remove travel bans from March 25


  • China
  • Tuesday, 24 Mar 2020

Migrant workers and their relatives queue as they prepare to get on a special train before departing to Shenzhen, in Yichang in China's central Hubei province on March 23, 2020. - People in central China where the coronavirus was first detected are allowed to go back to work and public transport is restarting, as some normality slowly returns after a two-month lockdown. - AFP

BEIJING (Agencies): The Health Commission for China's Hubei province said on Tuesday (March 24) it will remove all travel restrictions in and out of the province on March 25, with the exception of the city of Wuhan, the provincial capital and the epicentre of the country's coronavirus outbreak.

Travel restrictions for leaving Wuhan will be lifted on April 8, and people will be able to leave on the basis of using a health code, the commission said. The city has been under lockdown since Jan 23.

The easing of restrictions comes as Hubei reported that new infections dropped to zero on March 19, a dramatic plunge from the height of an epidemic that’s infected more than 80,000 Chinese and killed over 3,200.

President Xi Jinping has been projecting confidence that his government has stemmed the outbreak in China.

On March 10, Xi visited Wuhan, the capital of Hubei, for the first time since the disease emerged. But with the virus accelerating its spread globally and Europe now reporting more cases than China, the world’s second-largest economy will struggle to resume full activity.

China on Jan 23 took unprecedented steps to lock down Wuhan and surrounding regions, effectively restricting the movements of 60 million people in Hubei province as infections spun out of control.

The measures stopped air and rail travel and restricted those who could leave by car, while harsher measures banned large gatherings and sought to keep residents in their homes.

Some critics saw the quarantine as a heavy-handed approach following earlier failures to act quickly enough to stem the spread. As the virus spread globally, other countries including Italy, the Philippines and India have begun nationwide lockdowns.

Though Hubei’s quarantine may have averted hundreds of thousands of cases, according to the World Health Organization, it put coronavirus patients in the province at a much higher mortality rate than other regions.

As cases in Hubei multiplied, hospitals were overwhelmed by patients and a dearth of supplies, forcing them to turn away people with other critical illness.

Chinese officials have been moving to ease the quarantine in steps as new cases dropped toward zero from a peak of 15,000 a month ago.

Hubei last week started allowing some residents in lower-risk areas to leave the province for work.

According to local media reports, people have to get a “green code” certification proving they are in good health in order to leave.

On the same day as Xi’s visit earlier this month, all patients were discharged from the mobile hospitals in Wuhan, which the government built temporarily to quarantine and treat mild-syndrome patients when the hospitals were overloaded with patients. - Reuters/Bloomberg

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