Honouring legacy of Flying Sikh


Jesmail (left) saying hello to 10-month-old Ekamjit Singh who, according to his mother, Thiejweender Kaur, is following in his brother Eashar’s footsteps. The latter was only four when he took part in Good Will Walk 2015. Looking on is grandmother Baljith Kaur.

Jesmail (left) saying hello to 10-month-old Ekamjit Singh who, according to his mother, Thiejweender Kaur, is following in his brother Eashar’s footsteps. The latter was only four when he took part in Good Will Walk 2015. Looking on is grandmother Baljith Kaur.

SPREADING peace, unity and compassion was the aim of 300 participants who took part in the Good Will Walk (GWW).

The Sri Dasmesh Pipe Band led walkers from the starting point in Jalan Amra 2, Sentul, Kuala Lumpur.

Taking part were Batu MP P. Prabakaran and family members of the late Rishiwant Singh, also known as the Flying Sikh, who founded GWW.

In his speech, Dr Harwant Singh Randhawa paid tribute to his brother Rishiwant.

“Growing up, our parents constantly reminded us to choose our vocations wisely.

“While many would base this choice on personal interest, Rishi saw the nobility in humanitarian work,” said Harwant, who took over as president of the Malaysia Food Bank, which was also founded by his brother.

Rishiwant died in a motorcycle accident in Punjab, India on Nov 25, 2018.

He was one of 10 individuals and groups who were given The Star Golden Hearts Awards 2016 by Star Media Group in recognition of his humanitarian works.

Good Will Walk participants including Harwant (black turban) and Prabakaran (right) saying a prayer at the Sri Lanka Buddhist Temple.

To show appreciation for those who had supported his brother’s cause, Harwant called the pioneer walkers who had joined the first series of GWW in 2014 up on stage.

Among them were Briton David Atthowe, who had walked across Malaysia and India, as well as Jesmail Singh Sidhu who, at 80, was the oldest participant.

Motivational speaker Zhariff Affandi was also acknowledged. Despite being born without arms, he is active in community work.

Participants stopped at the Sri Lanka Buddhist Temple, Athi Eeswaran Hindu Temple, Amru Al-As Mosque and Gurdwara Sahib Sentul – where they were served breakfast – before proceeding to St Joseph Church.

Iman Aidid, 13, came with a group of friends from Kawasan Rukun Tetangga Rumah Tiga Tingkat, Taman Datuk Senu, Kuala Lumpur.

The group, who are active members of their community’s muay thai club Nakama Punch, were there to show support for Prabakaran.

“We wanted to run but our coach said we shouldn’t as this is a walk. We are glad we followed his advice as we got to enjoy the camaraderie with other participants,” said one of Iman’s friends.

Another participant was Reena Josefa, who is blind.

Good Will Walk participants from Britain, including Molly Wright (second from right), showing their certificates of participation.

“I took part because this was my chance to do something for those who are poor and hungry.

“All this while, I have only managed to talk to them and pray for them,” said Reena who completed the walk with the assistance of a partner.

Also walking the talk were Guru Nanak Community Kitchen founder Deep Singh, who has been serving hot vegetarian meals to the less fortunate in the city every Friday night for the past 15 years.

International non-profit humanitarian organisation United Sikhs director Sunil Singh also took part.

The procession led by Prabakaran and Harwant broke out into a slow run during the last 10m and were met by ACP S. Shanmugamoorthy at the end of the walk.

Central Region