Huawei challenges U.S. FCC over national security threat designation


FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at the IFA consumer technology fair, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany September 3, 2020. REUTERS/Michele Tantussi/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Huawei Technologies Co has filed a legal challenge to the Federal Communications Commission's designation of the Chinese company as a U.S. national security threat to communications networks.

The FCC in June formally designated China's Huawei and ZTE Corp as security threats, a declaration barring U.S. firms from tapping an $8.3 billion government fund to purchase equipment from the companies. In December the FCC rejected a petition from Huawei asking the agency to reconsider its decision.

Huawei said in a petition filed late on Monday with the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the FCC order exceeded "statutory authority; violates federal law and the Constitution; is arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion."

The FCC did not immediately comment on Huawei's petition.

The agency also in December finalized rules requiring carriers with ZTE or Huawei equipment to "rip and replace" that equipment. It created a reimbursement program for that effort, and U.S. lawmakers in December approved $1.9 billion to fund the program.

Also in December, the FCC began the process of revoking China Telecom's authorization to operate in the United States as it took further steps to crack down on China's role in U.S. telecommunications.

China Telecom, the largest Chinese telecommunications company, has had authorization to provide telecommunications services for nearly 20 years.

The FCC in April warned that it might shut down the U.S. operations of three state-controlled Chinese telecommunications companies, citing national security risks. They include China Telecom Americas, China Unicom Americas, Pacific Networks Corp and its wholly owned subsidiary ComNet (USA) LLC.

In May 2019, the FCC voted to deny another state-owned Chinese telecommunications company, China Mobile, the right to provide services in the United States, citing risks that the Chinese government could use the approval to conduct espionage against the U.S. government.

(Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Dan Grebler)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3

   

Next In Tech News

LG�phones are no more. Will you miss them? More than you might think
South Korean battery makers agree last-minute deal in boost to Biden's EV policy
Messenger chats bring people closer than video chat, study finds
Wave of phishing emails feared after massive Facebook leak uncovered
Stifel CEO says life after Covid-19 means a return to the office
Need more bass?�Tweak the sound of your headphones with an EQ�app
NASA space copter ready for first Mars flight
Digital farewells: A guide to painless pandemic-era office goodbyes
Lean forward - and other ways to radiate competence on Zoom
Judge hands Amazon a setback in New York lawsuit over COVID-19 shortfalls

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers