TSA to crowdsource airport security solutions with US$15,000 reward


  • TECH
  • Friday, 01 Aug 2014

The US transportation authority is offering US$15,000 (RM47,967.75) in rewards to the people who can come up with the smartest ideas for shortening mile-long queues at airport security. 

In addition to a nice little windfall, the winners would also become national heroes for decreasing the number of missed flights and connections and improving one of the most loathed parts of the airport and travel experience. 

Instead of outsourcing the idea themselves, the Transportation Security Administration has launched a crowdsource campaign, inviting travellers to submit their best ideas on how to speed up regular airport security lanes, lines for cabin crew, premiere passengers and TSA Pre, an expedited screening for low-risk travellers. 

TSA Pre passengers can pass through security screening without having to remove their belt, shoes, jackets or laptop computer. 

Keep in mind that plans have to take into consideration everything from peak and non-peak hours, flight schedules as well as TSA staffing schedules. 

Total payout will be US$15,000 (RM47,967.75) with at least one submission winning a minimum of US$5,000 (RM15,989.25). 

Contest closes Aug 15. For more info, visit their website. — ©AFP/Relaxnews 2014

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