Something for everyone


The Star Education Fair provides a platform for institutions to share a wealth of information on programmes available and for students to shop around on what interests them.

THERE’S more to becoming a doctor than just donning a stethoscope, a fancy white lab coat and diagnosing a patient.

Newcastle University Medicine Malaysia clinical senior lecturer Dr Ong Gim Seong said those wanting to pursue medicine should understand that medical undergraduate courses are long and intense. Cost is also a factor.

Dr Ong urged potential students to consider the reasons they want to become doctors and not to be influenced by medical dramas on tv.

MAHSA University Faculty of Medicine dean Prof Datuk Dr Ravindran Jegasothy said students should ask the “right questions” when researching medical schools. They need to consider the reputation of their chosen institution and how many of their graduates successfully completed housemanship, he added.

Those with qualifications in allied health sciences are in demand, said Ramsay Sime Darby Healthcare College education chief executive officer Shanaz FH Mawji. There is a demand for “quality and skilled” nurses, she said, adding that they can earn upwards of RM10,000 per month in Saudi Arabia.

There is no doubt that medicine is a noble profession and those in it can gain extra experience treating patients even before they enter their clinical years. How? By volunteering, said SEGi University Faculty of Medicine tutor (anatomy) Dr Ahmad Yusuf Yahaya.

Different pathways: SMR Corporate Office career adviser and CEO Syed Muzakir Al-Jofre (right) explains to a visitor that a personality test will help students understand what drives and motivates them, as well as which career path is most suited to them. Cyberjaya University College of Medical Sciences (CUCMS) in partnership with SMR Group hosted a Career Personality Test known as the “CUCMS Career Compass” during the two-day fair.
Different pathways: SMR Corporate Office career adviser and CEO Syed Muzakir Al-Jofre (right) explains to a visitor that a personality test will help students understand what drives and motivates them, as well as which career path is most suited to them. Cyberjaya University College of Medical Sciences (CUCMS) in partnership with SMR Group hosted a Career Personality Test known as the “CUCMS Career Compass” during the two-day fair.

There are many opportunities to volunteer for medical, dental and pharmacy students, he said, adding that they can even volunteer with the medical teams who go to disaster areas.

The sheer joy and satisfaction, he added, of knowing that an individual has saved someone’s life without expecting any form of compensation cannot be described.

Dr Ong, Prof Ravindran , Shanaz and Dr Ahmad Yusuf were among those who spoke on “Pursuing Medicine and Health Sciences during the Star Education Fair 2016 held last weekend.

There was a stream of visitors to the fair who checked out the wealth of information available on certificate, foundation, diploma, vocational, degree and postgraduate courses as well as professional qualifications all under one roof. There was more than 80 exhibitors taking up 200 booths.

StudyExcel Sdn Bhd general manager Jerry Tan who spoke about “Choosing The Right Pathway And Study Options”, focused on the seven pathways of interests, which are creating, organising, servicing, influencing, investigating, producing,and adventuring.

“After identifying the interest category you are most suited for as well as your strengths and weaknesses, focus on searching for a pre-university course which can provide you the best base for your future degree course,” he said.

Limkokwing University of Creative Technology vice-president of corporate relations Datuk Fajura Juffa Mohd Mustafa Kamal spoke on “Creative Industries: The New Economy of the World”.

Rapt attention: Parents and their children listen carefully to the speakers during the talk on “Pursuing Medicine and Health Sciences”.
Rapt attention: Parents and their children listen carefully to the speakers during the talk on “Pursuing Medicine and Health Sciences”.

“Creativity is about creating ideas and solving problems,” she said. She urged parents to change their misconception on the creative industry.

“Do allow your child to be creative. Promote their talents and what they are good at so they can be the best,” she said.

Business Hotel Management School Switzerland corporate marketing manager Laurent Joliat spoke about “Opportunities in Switzerland - Service Industry Trends and Job Opportunities upon studying in Switzerland”.

He said the main question students should ask themselves are what their dream job is and what they wish to pursue.

“An employer does not only expect a degree, but a good attitude, appropriate behaviour, curiosity, engagement and mostly experience,” he said.

Malaysian American Commission on Educational Exchange EducationUSA Advising Centre adviser Kavita Chandran spoke on the different options available to study in the US.

Yap Wei Hon, 23, said he attended the talk, to help his younger brother make a decision upon leaving school. It was informative, he added.

Try some: Academy of Pastry Arts Malaysia executive chef Clifford Cheah Li Yew handing out samples of yellow watermelon with balsamic vinegar to visitors at their booth during the fair.
Try some: Academy of Pastry Arts Malaysia executive chef Clifford Cheah Li Yew handing out samples of yellow watermelon with balsamic vinegar to visitors at their booth during the fair.

British Council education manager June Lo shared the benefits of studying in the United Kingdom during her talk on “Opportunities in UK”.

“A British qualification is recognised worldwide,” she said. She also shared the various websites where parents and students can conduct detailed research before making a decision.

Shiirosha Sathiyanaraina Rao travelled from Rawang to hear what Kavita had to share.

“It was very useful and has given me a better idea of what I want to pursue,” said Shiirosha, 19.

Parents and students were all ears when KDU University College Professional Accountancy Centre academic department head Chan Tze Kang gave his talk on “Careers in Accounting - the Pathway to Professional Qualification”.

Chan’s talk focused on the range of career opportunities that opens up when one holds a professional accountancy qualification.

Parent Wang Leong Seng found Chan’s talk enlightening. “It was very easy to understand and I would have been happy to have him as my lecturer,” said Wang.

Creativity: Limkokwing University of Creative Technology Faculty of Fashion lecturer Ellen Wilson (left) explains to Master’s in Architecture student Marwa Elbadri that the special fashion section was set up at the booth to showcase their students’ works of art.
Creativity: Limkokwing University of Creative Technology Faculty of Fashion lecturer Ellen Wilson (left) explains to Master’s in Architecture student Marwa Elbadri that the special fashion section was set up at the booth to showcase their students’ works of art.

SIM Global Education executive Robert Kong spoke about “Making an Informed Choice – Business Options in Singapore”.

He covered four main points — the course, the country, cost and campus life — to assist potential students to make a sound choice of what they want to do.

Brickfields Asia College programme manager and lecturer Andrew Kalish said a law degree opens many doors and career opportunities due to its versatility, during his talk on “Career Pathways with a Law degree”.

Sunway Le Cordon Bleu general manager Ming Rathswohl Ho shared tips on becoming a successful chef in her talk “How to become a global chef”.

“To become a global chef, one needs excellent skills and this is acquired through years of practice in the field of culinary arts,” she said.

First City University College Faculty of Design and Built Environment senior lecturer Arthur Liaw Ik Han said a designer requires more skills than the mere ability to draw. During his talk “Graphic Design: Overview of Career Pathway”, he said one must be able to think critically, conceptually, creatively as well as know the different principles and theories of design.

UNITAR International University Faculty of Architecture and Design lecturer and QW Advertising Sdn Bhd co-founder Mohd Hafidz Rodzi said when students enrol into an Architecture and Design course, they are entering a world where they can work independently and open up their own firms.

More convenient: National Higher Education Fund Corporation (PTPTN) assistant branch manager Noorazriena Omar spoke on the process of applying for a PTPTN loan at the Star Education Fair 2016.
More convenient: National Higher Education Fund Corporation (PTPTN) assistant branch manager Noorazriena Omar spoke on the process of applying for a PTPTN loan at the Star Education Fair 2016.

“They can start freelancing as early as the second semester of their course,” he said during his talk on “Prospects for careers in Architecture and Design”.

Parent Paul Low Meng Choon who attended the talk by Mohd Hafidz with his wife and daughter, said it was informative and interesting.

“I’m here to help my daughter make a decision if architecture and graphic design is what she wants to do,” he said.

Meanwhile, Sunway University Department of Psychology head (Academic) Prof Hew Gill said there is a lot more to being a psychologist than being nice to unhappy people. Psychology is not confined to just treating and helping people with difficulties, he said while delivering a talk on “Psychology – Career of the Future”.

He invited several volunteers on stage to demonstrate and explain the different types of body language commonly used.

“It’s psychology in action. This is the science of how the mind perceives things,” he said, as he demonstrated techniques and subtle nuances of psychology to keep his audience captivated throughout.

The automotive industry in Malaysia is “misunderstood” due to the many wrong perceptions about it, said TOC Automotive College founder and chief executive officer Adelaine Foo.

Foo who spoke on “Creating the Automotive Specialists of Tomorrow”, said those wanting to become automotive technicians need to be well-trained as vehicles nowadays employ high-technology in their mechanics.

University Malaysia of Computer Science and Engineering vice-chancellor Prof Datuk Dr Khairuddin Ab Hamid said there is a huge mismatch between what the ICT industry needs and the abilities of ICT graduates. He said competent workers are needed to cater to the growing demand for an ICT workforce in Malaysia.

Decorated to look like a cockpit: Asian Aviation Centre of Excellence sales and marketing/commercial head Shahril Omar explains about careers in aviation to Darren Yu (left).
Decorated to look like a cockpit: Asian Aviation Centre of Excellence sales and marketing/commercial head Shahril Omar explains about careers in aviation to Darren Yu (left).

   

Across The Star Online