6 Christmas cocktails that will make your festive season merrier


xmasdrinks

Planning a Christmas party but not sure what cocktails to make? Here are some of the more traditional Christmas drinks out there you can try.

Eggnog

Eggnog is one of the most traditional of all Christmas cocktails.Eggnog is one of the most traditional of all Christmas cocktails.One of the most traditional Christmas drinks around is the eggnog. Eggnog is a sweet, frothy, rich drink that is traditionally made from dairy products such as milk and cream, sugar, some form of spirit (traditionally brandy, whisky or rum), and as the name suggests, eggs.

There are actually many variations of eggnog. You can have it chilled or warm, with rum, brandy or whisky, or even non-alcoholic or low-carbohydrate. The basic ingredients of the recipe, however, are pretty much the same – beaten eggs, sugar, milk or cream, and some kind of spirit and maybe a smattering of spices (particularly nutmeg).

Eggnog is said to have originated in the 17th century, when milk and eggs were expensive commodities in Europe. The richer segments of society would serve it during Christmas and special occasions and often used it to toast to each other’s health.

The name itself is said to have been derived from the word “noggin”, which is an Old English word for a wooden mug used to serve alcohol.

Another version of the origin of the name is that English colonists who used rum in their recipe used to call it “egg and grog”, which was eventually shortened to eggnog.

Mulled wine

Mulled wine is a punch cocktail that is usually served warm.Mulled wine is a punch cocktail that is usually served warm.Besides eggnog, another traditional Christmas drink in Europe is mulled wine, which is a punch cocktail that is usually served warm.

While drinking warm wine may be a bit odd Malaysia, over in Europe, drinking mulled wine helps to warm the body during cold winter months.

Like eggnog, there are lots of variations of mulled wine, but the essential ingredients include wine (usually red), brandy or rum, sugar, and an assortment of spices. The mixture is then simmered over a fire to bring out the flavour in the spices.

Wassail

The more traditional wassail recipes actually use sherry, but cider is commonly used as well.The more traditional wassail recipes actually use sherry, but cider is commonly used as well.Another punch-type drink that is traditionally consumed during Christmas is wassail, which involves mixing apple cider, pineapple juice, citrus herbal tea and spices such as cinnamon and cloves, and simmering the whole concoction for a few hours.

The more traditional ones use sherry, but cider versions are common too. Most recipes also use either brandy or rum. This is a nice spiced drink that really adds the aroma of Christmas into the air.

Snowball

The Snowball is a popular Christmas drink in Britain and is made with a Dutch egg-based liqueur called Advocaat. — Photos: MICHAEL CHEANG/The StarThe Snowball is a popular Christmas drink in Britain and is made with a Dutch egg-based liqueur called Advocaat. — Photos: MICHAEL CHEANG/The StarThe Snowball is a popular Christmas drink in Britain, and according to Difford’s Guide, thought to have originated there during the late 1940s or early 1950s. It is traditionally made with Advocaat (a strong liqueur of Dutch origin made from eggs, sugar and brandy), and lime juice or cordial together with ice.

The lemonade and lime cuts through the thick, creamy advocaat nicely, making for quite a unique drink that is savoury, sweet, yet refreshing.

Poinsettia

The Poinsettia is named after the red flower associated with Christmas.The Poinsettia is named after the red flower associated with Christmas.Named after the red flower that is so commonly associated with Christmas, with a ruby red appearance that is also inspired by the flower.

This is a relatively simple Christmas cocktail that just calls for orange liqueur (or triple sec), cranberry juice and champagne. It’s the perfect Christmas party drink!

Tom And Jerry

The Tom And Jerry can be a pain to make, but it is well worth the work.The Tom And Jerry can be a pain to make, but it is well worth the work.A classic winter drink that has been around since 1820, this can be a bit challenging to make.

First you first need to make a batter by whisking two egg yolks with sugar, cinnamon powder, nutmeg powder and rum together, before folding in two egg whites that have been whisked until it has soft peaks.You then add the batter into a cup with one part brandy and one part rum while slowly stirring in warm milk.

Yes, the Tom & Jerry is served warm, and is actually a nice alternative to eggnog. It’s quite tasty too, like a frothy, fluffy eggnog but with added spice and rum/brandy goodness.

Michael Cheang wishes you all a merry Christmas and happy holidays. See you next year! Follow him on Facebook (fb.com/mytipsyturvy) or Instagram (@MyTipsyTurvy).

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