British singer Calum Scott loves nasi lemak, nasi goreng, onde onde: 'Sedap gila'


Calum Scott can't get enough of Malaysian food. Photo: Handout

British singer Calum Scott, 35, has performed in Malaysia numerous times, and he finds himself drawn back to our country time and again.

He is fascinated by the country's rich culture and heritage, particularly enjoying its local delights.

"Malaysian food is sedap gila (insanely delicious). Nasi lemak, nasi goreng and ayam masak lemak are my favourites. I also love onde onde.

"And if there is one thing that I could take back to Britain, it would be teh halia. It is simply delicious. The whole artistic way of pulling tea is simply impressive.

"Apart from the amazing people and food, my music also brings me back to Malaysia. It’s the joy of traveling, the joy of adventure and of learning new things about Malaysia. Essentially, it's the spirit of the country," Scott told The Star.

The singer was the opening act for fellow British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran at the latter's Mathematics Tour at Bukit Jalil National Stadium in Kuala Lumpur last Saturday (Feb 24).

Scott expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to open for Sheeran on his tour, describing it as a surreal experience.

"Ed could have chosen anybody for the shows, and the fact that he asked me to support him across Asia and Europe is huge for me. It makes me feel like I'm doing a great job," said Scott.

Scott catapulted to stardom in 2015 following his memorable appearance on Britain's Got Talent (BGT). He showcased his rendition of Robyn's chart-topping hit, Dancing On My Own, ultimately earning the prestigious "Golden Buzzer" from BGT judge Simon Cowell.

Since then, Scott has released two albums – Only Human and Bridges.

Irfan (left) chose to introduce Scott to Pudu Prison Gate to illustrate Malaysia's history. Photo: HandoutIrfan (left) chose to introduce Scott to Pudu Prison Gate to illustrate Malaysia's history. Photo: Handout

On Monday (Feb 26), Scott explored Pudu Prison Gate in Kuala Lumpur, accompanied by content creator Irfan Shah, 27. Known for sharing lesser-known historical facts about Malaysia on his social media platforms, Irfan provided the British singer with a commentary of the former prison during the visit.

"It's fascinating to learn that the jail was originally built on a Chinese cemetery and how it has evolved over time," Scott said."This transformation mirrors the changes we see in music, fashion, and food culture. What I admire most is that despite these transformations, there's still a sense of identity preserved, allowing people to remember and commemorate its history," shared Scott, who is currently working on material for his third album.

Since Scott has visited other prominent landmarks like KLCC in his past visits, Irfan suggested Pudu Prison to the singer to highlight a darker chapter of Malaysian history.

"I wanted to show him that despite our country’s undeniable beauty, Malaysia also has a complex history. We should not only embrace the good sides, but the darker parts of our history too, as they have played a big role in forming the Malaysia that we know today," Irfan said.

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