Robots are learning to think like humans. Can they meet Amazon’s demands for speed?


Amazon has committed to reducing incident rates by 50% by 2025, Amazon spokesperson Kent Hollenbeck said. And it's going to use technology to get there, Jeff Bezos told shareholders in his last letter as CEO before stepping down. — Reuters

In a lab at the University of Washington (UW), robots are playing air hockey.

Or they’re solving Rubik’s Cubes, mastering chess or painting the next Mona Lisa with a single laser beam.

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