SpaceX's Starlink expects it can provide global coverage around September


SpaceX Starlink 5 satellites are pictured in the sky seen from Svendborg on South Funen, Denmark April 21, 2020. Picture taken with long exposure. Ritzau Scanpix/Mads Claus Rasmussen via REUTERS/Files

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Starlink, the satellite internet unit of Elon Musk's SpaceX, expects to be able to provide continuous global coverage by around September but will then need to seek regulatory approvals, its president Gwynne Shotwel said on Tuesday.

"We've successfully deployed 1,800 or so satellites and once all those satellites reach their operational orbit, we will have continuous global coverage, so that should be like September timeframe," she told a Macquarie Group technology conference via webcast.

"But then we have regulatory work to go into every country and get approved to provide telecoms services."

Starlink, which has said it plans to deploy 12,000 satellites in total at a cost of roughly $10 billion, currently offers beta services in 11 countries, Shotwel said.

In May, Musk said the low-Earth orbiting satellite network had received more than 500,000 preorders for its internet service and anticipates no technical problems meeting demand.

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission this year approved SpaceX's plan to deploy some Starlink satellites at a lower earth orbit than planned to provide high-speed broadband internet services to people who currently lack access.

Starlink is one of a growing number of makers of small satellites that also includes Amazon.com's Kuiper, Britain's OneWeb, venture capital-backed Planet, and Raytheon Technologies Corp's Blue Canyon Technologies.

(Reporting by Paulina Duran in Sydney; Editing by Edwina Gibbs)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
Join our Telegram channel to get our Evening Alerts and breaking news highlights

   

Next In Tech News

Kitchen robot in Riga cooks up new future for fast food
Google to build its own chip for new Pixel smartphone
Olympic athletes inspire robotic zen garden in Tokyo
Instagram says resolved issue affecting some users
Micron kicks off dividend payments, shifts to 'opportunistic' share buybacks
AT&T's DirecTV to become standalone video business
Twitter partners with AP, Reuters to battle misinformation on its site
Google to launch own processor for upcoming Pixel phones
Ferrari boss has no fears over electric future
Facebook's Kustomer deal may hurt competition, EU regulators say

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers