Samsung rolls out 64-megapixel image sensor


Samsung says GW1 supports real-time HDR, close to how the human eye perceives its surroundings in a mixed light environment. — Samsung

Samsung says GW1 supports real-time HDR, close to how the human eye perceives its surroundings in a mixed light environment. — Samsung

Samsung Electronics introduced two image sensors, including one that captures 64-megapixel photos – the highest resolution yet by the company.

The 64-megapixel Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and 48-megapixel ISOCELL Bright GM2 are the latest additions to its 0.8-micrometer (μm) image sensor lineup, with the previous model having just 20-megapixels.

Samsung says a 0.8μm image sensor is the smallest pixel size currently available in the market. This allows more pixels to fit on a small sensor.

Samsung Electronics executive vice-president of sensor business Yongin Park says over the past few years, mobile phone cameras have become the main instrument for recording and sharing everyday moments.

“With more pixels and advanced pixel technologies, Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and GM2 will bring a new level of photography to today’s sleekest mobile devices that will enhance and help change the way we record our daily lives,” he said in a press release

Both sensors are claimed to have the technology to merge four pixels into one to produce bright images with a lower pixel count in low-light environments and highly-detailed shots with a full pixel count in brighter settings.

Samsung says GW1 also supports real-time high dynamic range (HDR) close to how the human eye perceives its surroundings in a mixed light environment, resulting in richer hues in photos.

The sensors use phase detection auto-focus technology to focus on a scene faster and to be able to capture full HD recording at 480fps (frames per second) for smooth cinematic slow motion videos, according to the company.

Samsung says the GW1 and GM2 are expected to be in mass production in the second half of 2019.

Sony announced a similar 48-megapixel 0.8μm sensor in July last year, which has since been adopted by several different brands' smartphones.