Your desk can help you win a printer


THEY say clothes and manners make the man. In the same vein, your desk makes and defines you.

Your desk is much more than a place to get work done. It says more about you than you think because it reflects your personal and work attitudes.

We’ve all seen colleagues ­shaking their heads at a messy desk, with unwashed coffee cup and stacks of paper spilling over. But that’s not a bad thing because some experts feel that those with cluttered desks usually have a creative and agile mind.

Generally, there are three types of desk users — the geek, the ­greenie and the minimalist.

The geek’s desk is filled with action figures or computer game-related toys because that’s what he likes — objects for work and play close at hand. To break away from the mundane at work, the geek will turn to his ­playthings. Sometimes, he even draws ­inspiration from these toys.

Next is the greenie. This ­deskbound worker is a true blue environmentalist and you can tell because he or she will have plenty of potted plants on the desk, or maybe a tiny aquarium.

To a ­greenie, a desk without living things is a dead zone where ideas are suffocated, not born.

Last, is the minimalist. This is the neat freak in the group, and ­arguably the most efficient ­worker. He or she likes to clear any and all work from the desktop because they hate clutter. Their desk reflects this, in that there’s a place for everything and ­everything will be in its place.

Three for three

Now, imagine that you have to design a printer that will meet the needs of these three types of desk jockeys. Actually, you don’t. Samsung already has, for its latest series of printers.

The South Korean vendor believes its ultra-compact ML-1660 ­monochrome laser printer will appeal to the geek because its small footprint will not use up precious desktop real-estate reserved for action figures.

This device is a smallish 341 x 224 x 184mm in size but users will not have to compromise in print quality or printing speed, said Samsung. It has a print resolution of 1,200 x 600dpi (dots per inch) and can churn out up to 16 A4-size pages per minute (ppm).

If you are the type that has potted plants on the desk and loathe the waste of energy, you’ll likely ­appreciate Samsung’s CLX-3185 multifunction colour laser printer.

This device is also a copier and scanner, but more importantly to you, has an eco-copy feature for combining multiple pages and printing them on a single sheet of A4 paper.

It has an optimised print ­resolution of 2,400 x 600dpi and a print speed of 4ppm for colour pages, and 16ppm for monochrome documents. The printer measures 388 x 313 x 243mm.

Finally, the minimalists and those who prefer a super-organised ­workstation, Samsung offers the CLP-325 colour laser printer.

The clean lines of this 388 x 313 x 243mm printer will blend nicely with the other sleek items on your desk. It shucks out four colour A4-size pages per minute, with print resolutions of up to 2,400 x 600dpi.

But one feature in all these three printers that everyone will ­appreciate is the print-screen button. Located on each printer, you just push that to print out whatever is on your computer screen. Neat, eh?

This feature could appeal to geek/gamers wanting to show off their top scores or winner screens, while greenies can make nice pictures from digital images. Even the ­minimalists will like this — it’s just one button. Ho-ho.

Show us your desk

We’ve saved the best part for last. Three people who read In.Tech and TechCentral are going to own one of these printers each. Welcome to The Star In.Tech/Samsung’s “Your Desk Tells A Lot About You” contest.

It’s easy-peasy to take part. Just e-mail a good and sharp picture of your desk, classify it as Geek, Greenie or Minimalist and include an explanation on why your desk is like that. Creativity and humour will be much appreciated here.

Next, complete this slogan in 20 words or less, in the same e-mail; Samsung laser printers make printing easy because …. Now, send the e-mail to stevecy@thestar.com.my.

The contest ends June 29. Winners will be announced the following month.

Here are the rules and ­regulations: 1. This contest is open to Malaysian citizens only; 2. Please provide your identity card number, name as appears on the identity card, and your phone number when you e-mail your entry; 3. The prizes are not ­exchangeable for cash and the organisers reserve the right to exchange the prize with another of similar value without prior notice; 4. Staff of Star Publications (M) Bhd and Samsung Malaysia Electronics Sdn Bhd, as well as their immediate families are not allowed to participate; 5. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entertained; 6. Winners will be notified by e-mail and by phone after the judging; 7. The list of winners will be published in In.Tech and on TechCentral; and, 8. Prizes will only be sent to winners outside the Klang Valley. However, the contest organisers will not be liable for damage or loss during the transit.

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