Global COVID-19 cases surpass 37 mln: Johns Hopkins University


  • World
  • Sunday, 11 Oct 2020

NEW YORK, Oct. 10 (Xinhua) -- Global COVID-19 cases surpassed 37 million on Saturday, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University.

The global case count reached 37,003,414, with a total of 1,069,836 deaths worldwide as of 2:23 p.m. local time (1823 GMT), the CSSE data showed.

The United States reported the most cases and deaths around the world, which stood at 7,689,358 and 214,004, respectively. India recorded 6,979,423 cases, just shy of the U.S. caseload. Brazil followed India with 5,055,888 cases, with the world's second largest death toll of 149,639.

Countries with more than 810,000 cases also include Russia, Colombia, Argentina, Spain, Peru and Mexico, while other countries with over 36,000 deaths include India, Mexico, Britain and Italy, according to the center.

The United States is witnessing a surge in new cases. According to the CSSE, a total of 57,420 new cases were confirmed nationwide on Friday, the third consecutive day since the country started to report more than 50,000 cases on Wednesday.

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

Next In World

Biden marks Selma anniversary with order to expand voting access
Manhattan’s real estate agents take up TikTok to find renters
New Zealand's Auckland emerges from weeklong coronavirus lockdown
A crisis with a woman’s face
Why it's so hard for survivors to come forward
Boy killed in Senegal protests as opposition steps up pressure
U.S. scientists doubtful of one-shot regimen for Pfizer, Moderna COVID vaccines - WSJ
Uptick in crimes against Mexican politicians points toward violent midterm election
U.S. envoy seeking support to shake up Afghan peace process, warring parties object
Mexican president defends 10-foot barriers to wall off women protesters

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers