2022 Architecture Drawing Prize celebrates built design through artistic expressions


The Hybrid category winner 'Fitzroy Food Institute' explores themes around the topics of Chinese culture, globalisation and automation. Photos: Architecture Drawing Prize

From a hand-drawn piece that explores the connection between what's natural and that which is created by people, to a work that delves into Chinese culture, development and progress, the winners stood out for their creativity and originality.

Selected among 138 entries from around the world, the category winners of the 2022 Architecture Drawing Prize were announced Oct 31.

Currently in its 6th year, the competition continues to celebrate the art of drawing in three categories: Hand-Drawn, Hybrid and Digital.

Weicheng Ye was declared the winner of the Hand-Drawn category for the piece, The Spirit Of Mountain.

Winner of the Hand-Drawn category, 'The Spirit Of Mountain' explores the relationship between the man-made and nature.Winner of the Hand-Drawn category, 'The Spirit Of Mountain' explores the relationship between the man-made and nature.

Drawn with pencil, the “atmospheric work explores the relationship between the man-made and nature”.

“This is a drawing of great delicacy which highlights the difference between a tall-building aesthetic, and the possibility of disrupting it in a creative way via the insertion of nature as an artistic intervention. A very worthy winner,” said Architecture Drawing Prize jury chair and director of the World Architecture Festival (WAF), Paul Finch.

The Hybrid category winner went to Fitzroy Food Institute by Samuel Wen, which explores themes around the topics of Chinese culture, globalisation and automation.

Fitzroy Food Institute stands out for its well-considered and subtle use of colour. It’s a very accessible drawing looking over a shared meal at a table, yet it is full of architectural interest featuring not only a plan, but sections and elevations as well as detail. A conceptually original and genuinely delightful entry,” commented Ken Shuttleworth, founder of Make Architects and one of the eight Prize judges.

Anton Markus Pasing, who was the overall winner of the Architecture Drawing Prize in 2019, was selected as the Digital category winner this year.

His drawing The Wall plays on ideas around the beginning, the end and the finite.

Artists Ben Langlands and Nikki Bell, who have been on the Architecture Drawing Prize as judges since its inception in 2017, commented on why Pasing’s approach to drawing caught the jury’s attention again.

The Wall fills the view with a golden elevation: Expansive and richly complex, it appears both vertical and horizontal, before us and below us, a terrain of construction and sedimented accumulation.

“It is not a border or a barrier, it is a space itself, a place of habitation, a record of social interaction. The wall is like time, it is history in the making,” they said.

Digital category winner 'The Wall' plays on ideas around the beginning, the end and the finite. Digital category winner 'The Wall' plays on ideas around the beginning, the end and the finite.

The Architecture Drawing Prize is co-curated by Make Architects, London’s Sir John Soane’s Museum and WAF.

“Sir John Soane’s Museum is pleased to partner with Make Architects and WAF in hosting the sixth edition of the Architecture Drawing Prize.

“This event has become a showcase for the best in contemporary draughtsmanship across media, which remains central to architectural practice today, and the Soane Museum is an appropriate venue for exhibiting both the winning and commended drawings,” said Bruce Boucher, director of the museum.

The Hand-Drawn category shortlist included The Temple Of Gaia by Giorgos Christofi, Final Mexico Drawing by Ben Johnson and Homage To Corb by Dustin Wheat.

Also shortlisted for the Hybrid category were The Stamper Battery by William du Toit and Traversing Dreamscapes by Sean Seah.One of the Digital category shortlists, 'Mnemosyne' by Meichen Duan.One of the Digital category shortlists, 'Mnemosyne' by Meichen Duan.

As for the Digital category, The Minecraft Labyrinth – A Reclamation Of Childhood by Eric Pham and Mnemosyne by Meichen Duan were among those that made it to the shortlist.

The public can view the shortlisted entries on the World Architecture Festival website.

The category winners’ works will be on display at the WAF – to be held in Lisbon, Portugal from Nov 30 to Dec 2 – where the winners will receive their awards at the Gala Dinner on the last day.

In the first half of next year, the shortlisted drawings will be exhibited at Sir John Soane’s Museum in London (Feb 8 – May 7, 2023) and the overall winner for 2022 will be announced at the museum’s Architecture Drawing Prize exhibition preview.

For the latest updates, follow @architecturedrawingprize on Instagram.

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