South Korean chat room operator gets 40 years for ‘sextortion’, blackmail


Cho, center, leader of South Korea’s online sexual blackmail ring dubbed ‘Nth room’, was sentenced on Nov 26 to 40 years in prison for blackmailing women, including minors, into filming sexually explicit video and selling them to others. — AP

SEOUL, South Korea: The operator of online chat rooms in South Korea was sentenced Nov 26 to 40 years in prison on charges of blackmailing dozens of women, including minors, into filming sexually explicit videos and selling them to others.

The Seoul Central District Court convicted Cho Ju-bin, 24, of violating laws on protecting minors and organising a criminal ring, court spokesman Kim Yong Chan said.

The court ruled Cho “used various methods to lure and blackmail a large number of victims into making sexually abusive contents and distributed them to many people for an extended period”, according to Kim. “He particularly disclosed the identities of many victims and inflicted irreparable damage to them.”

Cho has maintained he only cheated victims into making such videos but didn’t blackmail or coerce them, prompting some of the victims to testify in court.

Kim said the court decided to isolate Cho from society for a prolonged period in consideration of his attitude and the seriousness of his crime.

Both Cho and prosecutors, who had requested a life sentence, have one week to appeal.

Prosecutors formally arrested or indicted Cho and seven accomplices in June for allegedly producing sexually abusive videos of 74 victims, 16 of them minors, and distributing them on the Telegram messaging app, where users paid in cryptocurrency to watch them in 2019-2020.

A prosecutors’ statement called Cho’s group “a criminal ring” of 38 members. On Nov 26, the Seoul court sentenced five of Cho’s accomplices, one of them a 16-year-old, up to 15 years in prison.

When he was shown before the media following his initial detainment at a police station in March, Cho said “Thank you for stopping the life of a devil (I) couldn’t stop.”

Cho’s case has triggered an intense public uproar and soul-searching in South Korea over a culture that some experts say is too lenient about sexual violence and continuously fails the victims. President Moon Jae-in earlier called for a thorough investigation and stern punishment for those operating such chatrooms and their users.

In recent years, South Korea has been struggling to cope with what the government describes as digital sex crimes, which aside from abusive chatrooms also include the spread of intimate photos and videos taken by smartphones or tiny spy cameras hidden in public spaces and buildings, an issue that triggered massive protests in 2018. – AP

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