Feeling the pinch of inflation, consumers cut back on meal expenses


The inflationary pressure in 2022 is a global phenomenon due to elevated oil prices as well as global supply chain disruptions – causing the dramatic increase in food prices that has impacted Malaysians.

Giant’s Lower Prices That Last is a welcome campaign for consumers to manage food costs

MALAYSIANS love eating at all hours of the day. But dining out or ordering in has become a costly affair.

Inflation is now an all too familiar word, and when coupled with the ringgit’s value and the new minimum wage policy, it is no surprise that food prices have soared.

Finance Minister Tengku Zafrul Tengku Abdul Aziz has stated that the government will provide subsidies amounting to RM71bil this year, but the inflation rate is still at an all time high.

Zafrul said the inflationary pressure in 2022 is a global phenomenon due to elevated oil prices as well as global supply chain disruptions – causing the dramatic increase in food prices.

And Malaysians feel the pinch.

Robert Raj, 25, who is in between jobs, says eating out is too expensive for him these days.

“Chicken rice at my favourite restaurant in PJ is now RM8.50, when it used to be RM6 before Covid-19. The pandemic already made things difficult for us, and now food is pricier than ever.

“Cooking at home is also expensive because I would be cooking for one. Often it makes more sense for me to eat out because the price of cooking oil and other ingredients has shot up,” says Robert.

According to C.S. Tan whose family owns a restaurant in Subang Jaya, Selangor, their business had no choice but to raise prices by 10% to 20%.

“Of course our customers are not happy, but what to do? Everything has increased – oil, chicken, eggs.”

Retiree Anna Ong from Puchong, Selangor, says that a few years ago it was easy for her to manage her expenditure. But since the pandemic, things have changed.

“My grocery bills have gone up, for sure – like vegetables and eggs, before the government set a ceiling price.”

Ong says her family is small so they haven’t suffered as much because their grocery costs are relatively low to begin with.

“We have not bought beef for the longest time, and we have been eating less fresh fish. We limit our fish intake to frozen products from wholesalers which I purchase in bulk to get them a bit cheaper,” she says, adding that her family still eats out or tapau food “and this is when we can feel the pinch.”

Sharmini Ann Jacob, in her 50s, is an executive director who is a keen home cook. She says that since returning to the office after MCO, she only cooks at home in Klang twice or thrice a week.

“Everyone is back at the office or at school/college, so they all eat out. We also order in but delivery prices have gone up too. You end up paying about 25% more than when you go to the restaurant.”

A quick check on a food delivery app shows that one roti canai can cost about RM3 and chicken rice as much as RM12, minus delivery charges.

Nano Bites, 33, laments the present price of food. “Chicken, eggs, milk, flour, garbage bags, everything!” says the baker.

Nevertheless, she is not charging her customers more.

“I have been actively searching for the best prices for supplies and ingredients so I can maintain the prices for my customers. You just need to be savvy and know where to shop.”

Look out for the finger heart icon while you’re at Giant or Giant Mini stores for goods under the retailer’s Lower Prices That Last campaign which has kept prices of selected essential items low since last November.Look out for the finger heart icon while you’re at Giant or Giant Mini stores for goods under the retailer’s Lower Prices That Last campaign which has kept prices of selected essential items low since last November.

For example, Giant Malaysia has launched its Lower Prices That Last (LPTL) initiative to help consumers tackle rising costs.

LPTL is a nationwide campaign to lower the prices of everyday essentials across selected fresh produce and grocery items.

Fresh food such as fish, prawns, minced beef and vegetables, as well as sauces, canned food, pasta, snacks and beverages have been on the LPTL list since last November which means that their prices have been kept consistently low.

Consumers need not buy in bulk as they can shop any time with the assurance that these food prices will not be raised.

By planning ahead and cooking at home, you might just be able to manage your grocery bills better.

Just check out the list of items on LPTL at www.giant.com.my, then look out for the finger heart icon while you’re at the store.

While you’re online, you can also check out Giant’s “fresh offers” which highlight a wide selection of market produce, meat and seafood choices every week, as well as other promotions.

Shop at any Giant store nationwide, or at your neighbourhood Giant Mini. You can find more of your favourite items at www.giant.com.my/lowerpricesthatlast, with lower prices that are here to stay.

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