Barges mar serene Pangkor


  • Letters
  • Monday, 02 Jan 2012

WHAT used to be a clean and serene beach has become an industrial fishing haven for local fishermen looking to make a quick buck and not foreseeing the negative impact it could have on our tourism industry.

Once emerald clear green sea is now covered in oil slick, making it less appealing to frequent beach goers and foreign visitors to swim in.

Yes, this is Pangkor island – an island that was the perfect getaway from the hustle and bustle for city dwellers for a long weekend but is now marred by oil slicks and dangerous fishing activities.

Our four-night stay at a certain beach resort was quite a shocker when we noticed at least five large fishing boats coming in as close as 300 metres from the shore for their daily catch.

Old boats producing plumes of smoke were seen barely 250m (pic) from sea bathers!

This makes one wonder if the proximity of these boats to the shore is indeed legal.

The particular beach has been a favourite of ours for the past 20 years, with its gorgeous pristine clean beach and water.

We have recommended this place to many of our foreign friends for a short vacation.

However, after the recent trip there in December, we hesitate to recommend anyone a visit to Pangkor for fear of the bad impression it might have on them.

A recipe for a future environmental disaster is what it is.

Unless prompt action is taken

by the relevant authorities, tourists will stop visiting our Malaysian beaches and start looking for alternative holiday destinations to beaches such as in Thailand and Indonesia, taking along the revenue that could have belonged to us Malaysians.

As responsible citizens, it should be our duty to uphold the reputation that our Malaysian beaches have gained.

I hope the relevant authorities will take prompt action in saving our beautiful beaches.

As we aim to become a developed nation by 2020, let’s not lose ourselves in the race to get there in an unsustainable way.

Let us all cross the finish line without destroying what is left of nature.

SHOBINI KUPPER,

Pulau Pangkor.


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