What is MIND, the diet that may help protect against Alzheimer’s disease?


By AGENCY

Brain-friendly foods, especially leafy greens, are part of the MIND diet. — Dreamstime/TNS

You might be hearing more about the MIND diet of late.

A recent study has added to the evidence that the diet, which includes a variety of brain-friendly foods, may help protect against Alzheimer’s disease.

Angie Murad, a registered dietitian and nutritionist and patient educator at Mayo Clinic, explains the benefits of incorporating foods included in the MIND diet.

Eating certain foods can help improve brain health and preserve brain function.

There’s mounting scientific evidence that shows sticking to a method called the MIND diet can make a difference in your risk of cognitive decline and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.

“MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay,” Murad says.

“It’s a combination of two other healthy diets: the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, and includes a variety of brain-friendly foods.”

“What it emphasises are leafy greens; berries; nuts, specifically ones that are high in omega-3; fish; and an additional vegetable as well as the leafy greens,” Murad adds.

Murad says the MIND diet is high in nutrients and is not difficult to follow.

Foods to avoid or limit include butter, cheese, red meat and sweets. – Mayo Clinic News Network/Tribune News Service

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MIND diet , DASH diet

   

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