Taste of Malaysia’s floral heritage


Azizi showing his team’s creativity in using local flora to highlight Malaysia’s vibrant culinary heritage. — Photos: IZZRAFIQ ALIAS/The Star

THERE is a growing appreciation for the use of local herbs, fruits and even edible flowers in cooking.

Beyond aesthetics, these botanical additions elevate dishes and offer a host of benefits that extend beyond the plate.

The team at The St Regis Kuala Lumpur is making full use of Malaysia’s diverse flora, local herbs and fruits in its heritage-filled Ramadan buffet.

“Malam Warisan Melayu” features dishes from all 14 Malaysian states and incorporates fruits such as buah bacang (salom fruit), longan, roselle flowers and pineapple.

Penang Lamb Shank ‘Mamak’ Curry with ripe bananas that add subtle sweetness and a creamy texture.Penang Lamb Shank ‘Mamak’ Curry with ripe bananas that add subtle sweetness and a creamy texture.

Executive sous chef Azizi Taslim said the use of local herbs and fruits was one way to highlight the vibrant culinary heritage of the country.

“Some of them, such as daun kaduk (betel leaf), are hard to come by these days or typically used in certain regions.

“Here, we use these traditional herbs and fruits with a modern twist,” he said.

Even the various kerabu salads and sambal condiments had elements of fruits and herbs, Azizi added.

Short Ribs Rendang Tok made with beef and braised for several hours.Short Ribs Rendang Tok made with beef and braised for several hours.

A notable dish is the Penang Lamb Shank “Mamak” Curry with ripe bananas.

The lamb shank is slow-cooked to tender perfection in a fragrant curry infused with bold spices characteristic of Indian cuisine, such as cinnamon, cardamom, clove and star anise.

What sets this dish apart is the ripe bananas that add a subtle sweetness and creamy texture to the curry.

One dish to savour is the Short Ribs Rendang Tok – a Perak speciality where longjack (popularly known as Tongkat Ali) is an ingredient.

Traditionally made with buffalo meat, here beef short ribs are used and braised for several hours, leaving the meat flavourful while added roasted coconut enhances the spices.

Other highlights include Negri Sembilan speciality Smoked Beef Cartilage with turmeric as well as bird’s eye chilli and mango kerabu and Fresh Tiger Prawns with daun kaduk, lemongrass and passionfruit.

Part of the kerabu spread is the Sabahan ‘Hinava’ fermented fish with kaffir lime leaves.Part of the kerabu spread is the Sabahan ‘Hinava’ fermented fish with kaffir lime leaves.

For those who enjoy seafood, the Asam Pedas snapper fish – a Malaccan speciality – with okra and honey pineapple, is slightly spicy and sweet.

Also not to be missed is the assortment of kerabu and sambal, all made in-house.

The “Malam Warisan Melayu” menu will be on rotation, offering guests the opportunity to indulge in a diverse array of dishes.

Available until April 8, it is served at The Reading Room, Level 2, from 6.30pm to 10.30pm, and priced at RM268nett per adult and RM134nett per child (aged six to 12).

The St Regis Kuala Lumpur,

6, Jalan Stesen Sentral 2, Kuala Lumpur Sentral. (Tel: 03-2727 6696).

Business hours: 6.30am-11pm, daily.

This is the writer’s personal observation and is not an endorsement by StarMetro.

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st regis , ramadan , buffet ,

   

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