Seven killed after quake rocks Indonesia's Java island (update)


A man cleans up a damaged courtroom affected by an earthquake of magnitude 5.9 struck in the ocean 91 km (57 miles) south-southeast of Blitar, pictured in Blitar, East Java province, Indonesia, on Saturday, April 10, 2021, in this photo taken by Antara Foto/Irfan Anshori/via Reuters.

JAKARTA April 10 (AFP): At least seven people were killed after a 6.0 magnitude quake struck off the coast of Indonesia's main Java island Saturday, as the country reels from a cyclone disaster in another part of the archipelago.

The afternoon quake hit offshore about 45 kilometres southwest of Malang city in East Java, damaging hundreds of homes as well as schools, government offices and mosques across the region.

"Our latest data shows that seven people died, two are seriously injured and 10 others sustained minor injuries," said National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Raditya Jati.

Several communities had been evacuated, he added.

The quake struck at a relatively deep 82 kilometres (50 miles) -- shallower quakes tend to do more damage than deep ones.

Images from the scene showed a ceiling caved in at a hospital ward and debris strewn across the floor of the local parliament in Blitar, a city southwest of Malang.

"I had just finished praying and was changing my clothes when suddenly the quake struck," Malang resident Ida Magfiroh told AFP.

"It was pretty strong and went for a long time. Everything was swaying... My heart was racing."

The deadly quake comes as the Southeast Asian nation reels from a cyclone that killed more than 200 people in the eastern part of the archipelago and neighbouring East Timor this week.

Indonesia experiences frequent quakes and volcanic eruptions due to its position on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", an arc of intense seismic activity where tectonic plates collide that stretches from Japan through Southeast Asia and across the Pacific basin.

Among Indonesia's string of deadly quakes was a devastating 2004 tremor measuring 9.1 magnitude that struck off the coast of Sumatra and triggered a tsunami that killed 220,000 throughout the region, including about 170,000 in Indonesia.

The Boxing Day disaster was one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history.

In 2018, a powerful quake shook the island of Lombok and several more tremors followed over the next couple of weeks, killing more than 550 people on the holiday island and neighbouring Sumbawa.

Later that year, a 7.5-magnitude quake and a subsequent tsunami in Palu on Sulawesi island left more than 4,300 people dead or missing.

In 2006, a 6.3-magnitude quake rocked a densely populated region of Java near the city of Yogyakarta, killing around 6,000 people and injuring tens of thousands more.

A year earlier, a quake measuring 8.7 magnitude struck off the coast of Sumatra, which is particularly prone to quakes, killing 900 people and injuring about 6,000. - AFP
Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Next In Aseanplus News

Indonesia's Mount Sinabung erupts, ashes thrown 2,000 metres from peak
Thailand: Another daily 1,911 Covid-19 cases reported on Thursday (May 6) for 76,811-total; funeral services shortened due to Covid-19 deaths
Singapore says serious reactions to Covid-19 vaccinations rare; 18 virus cases - two in community reported on Thursday (May 6)
Indonesia detects 59 Covid-19 cases among international visitors from India; reports 5,647cases within one day to 1,697,305-total
Cambodia convicts five environmentalists over plan to march to PM's home
Vietnam extends quarantine for arrivals after new virus outbreak; reports 18 local new cases as total cases goes above 3,000
Indonesia deploys 400 battle-hardened troops to troubled Papua
Philippines' Duterte orders arrest of mask violators; govt announces 6,637 daily cases for a 1,080,172-total
Diplomatic missions to Myanmar underscore need for press freedom
US keeps close watch on Chinese Long March rocket debris, expects re-entry on Saturday

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers