Pokémon Go fad has passed but monster trespassing suit lives on


  • TECH
  • Friday, 30 Mar 2018

Netsertive employees Jenny Bramble, left, Rupert Sizemore, center left, Matthew Havens, center, and Sarah Palmer, right, play Pokemon Go while taking a quick break from their office on July 28, 2016 in Morrisville, N.C. (Ethan Hyman/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS)

Homeowners who blamed the Pokémon Go craze for disturbing their peace and wrecking their gardens will get their day in court. 

A federal judge in San Francisco ruled March 29 that private property owners can move forward with a trespassing case against Niantic Inc, the developer of the smartphone game for hunting virtual monsters. 

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