Thai junta chief says has not 'damaged' country, rights group disagrees


  • World
  • Wednesday, 26 Nov 2014

Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures to the media as he leaves after a handover ceremony for the new Royal Thai Army Chief, General Udomdej Sitabutra, at the Thai Army Headquarters in Bangkok September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha vigorously defended his position as leader on Wednesday, more than six months after he seized power in a bloodless coup, as a U.S.-based rights group said the country had fallen into an "apparently bottomless pit".

Thailand has seen a fresh wave of resistance to the junta over the past week with dozens detained and arrested for flashing anti-coup signs in public at the prime minister and for distributing anti-coup leaflets in the capital, Bangkok.

Start your ads-free experience now!

Monthly Plan

RM13.90/month

Annual Plan

RM12.33/month

Billed as RM148.00/year

1 month

Free Trial

For new subscribers only


Cancel anytime. No ads. Auto-renewal. Unlimited access to the web and app. Personalised features. Members rewards.
Follow us on our official WhatsApp channel for breaking news alerts and key updates!
   

Next In World

How Mark Zuckerberg’s Meta failed children on safety
She learned how to use a new prosthetic limb that learned from her
Google Maps deletes AI photos of Austrian landmarks after climate change
Artificial intelligence is a new source of hope in the fight against cancer
YouTube and Instagram outpace Netflix in some countries
From data to drugs: How AI is revolutionising drug development
Saudi Arabia registers 1,301 pilgrim deaths during Hajj
1st LD-Writethru: Traffic at Manchester Airport begins to resume after power cut
Chinese-funded aluminum industrial park will boost Angola's economic diversification: official
Feature: Ancient Syrian city of Bosra struggles to preserve precious heritage

Others Also Read