Mass beaching of whales fuels unscientific quake fears in Japan


  • Japan
  • Saturday, 11 Apr 2015

Local residents try to save melon-headed dolphins stranded on the coast in Hokota, north-east of Tokyo on April 10, 2015. -- PHOTO: AFP.

TOKYO (AFP): The mass beaching of more than 150 melon-headed whales on Japan's shores has fuelled fears of a repeat of a seemingly unrelated event in the country - the devastating 2011 undersea earthquake that killed around 19,000 people.

Despite a lack of scientific evidence linking the two events, a flurry of online commentators have pointed to the appearance of around 50 melon-headed whales - a species that is a member of the dolphin family - on Japan's beaches six days prior to the monster quake, which unleashed a towering tsunami and triggered a nuclear disaster.

Residents attempt to save melon-headed whales beached on the shore of Hokota city, north-east of Tokyo on April 10, 2015. -- PHOTO:AFP.

Scientists were on Saturday dissecting the bodies of the whales, 156 of which were found on two beaches on Japan's Pacific coast a day earlier, but could not say what caused the beachings.

"We don't see any immediate signs of diseases on their bodies, such as cancer. We want to figure out what killed these animals," Tadasu Yamada, a senior researcher at National Museum of Nature and Science, told public broadcaster NHK.

 

 

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3

Japan , Whales , Beaching

   

Next In Regional

Coronavirus: Hong Kong confirms 13 new cases; 300,000 Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine shots land in city
IMF offers rosier view on Asia, warns of Fed fallout on markets
Police looking for Indian workers seen being abducted in viral video
Covid-19 deaths back to double digits after two months
Philippines summons Chinese ambassador over vessels in disputed waters
Covid-19: Cases up by 1,767, bringing total to 363,940 (updated daily)
China warns 34 tech firms to curb excess in antitrust review
New scam targets delivery personnel from parcel and food delivery companies in Singapore
Bitcoin hits record high of US$62,575
Grab set to announce deal with US SPAC at US$40 bil valuation

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers