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Noodle shop reopens after decades-long absence


The Long Sheng Food Shop is famous for its beef wantan mee. — Photos: Sam Tham/The Star

The Long Sheng Food Shop is famous for its beef wantan mee. — Photos: Sam Tham/The Star

FANS of the Rembau Street beef wantan mee in Klang can now have another taste of this famous dish that had its heyday from the 1950s right up to the mid 1980s.

The home-made soup-based noodles used to have people lining up for it when Rembau Street still existed.

Back then, there were only two noodle shops along the entire stretch of what is now Jalan Tengku Kelana or Indian Street.

“In those days, there were also not many places in Klang offering this type of beef noodles. Our noodles were handmade so it made us stand out even more,” said Long Sheng Food Shop owner Eric Ng.

It was not until the middle of last year that Ng started up his old family business again with his wife and two sons, one of whom is the cook.

The curry chicken wantan mee comes in two separate bowls filled with plain noodles tossed in dark sauce, and flavourful curry chicken.
The curry chicken wantan mee comes in two separate bowls filled with plain noodles tossed in dark sauce, and flavourful curry chicken.

Located along Jalan Rodat in Bandar Bukit Raja Klang, the restaurant sells beef wantan mee along with other noodle dishes made using family recipes passed down over the years.

The only difference now is that the noodles are no longer handmade, but with machines.

“It’s too time consuming and tiring to be making large quantities of noodles by hand, but the recipe and process are still the same,” said Ng, who still remembers making noodles using bamboo with his father.

Although bamboo is no longer used in the noodle-making process, the noodles produced are still springy with a nice texture.

Unlike the usual wantan noodles, the shop’s beef noodles are not tossed in dark sauce.

Instead, they sit in a bowl of brown broth topped with beef tendon, meat and tripe.

“My dad brought this recipe all the way from his home in Guangzhou when he was younger and he slowly introduced it here.

The shop also has braised pork belly with black fungus, served with either rice or noodles.
The shop also has braised pork belly with black fungus, served with either rice or noodles.

“First, in Kuala Lumpur where he worked as a chef in a famous restaurant, and then in Klang when he decided to start up something on his own,” explained Ng.

The beef wantan mee is definitely different and takes a long time to make.

The broth itself requires more than six hours of cooking, which is why Ng only sells the dish on weekends and public holidays.

“We do not make extra and keep as we want everything to be fresh, so our food is usually only available until we sell out,” said Ng.

Another example of a dish that is made fresh daily is the shop’s pig trotter wantan mee in black vinegar.

This dish is a combination of sweet and sour with a generous amount of pig trotter on top of noodles tossed in black vinegar sauce.

Diners can choose between the wantan noodle, mee suah or even rice for those who do not want noodles.

We thought that the vinegar in this dish was not overly sour and was more on the sweet side.

The prawn dumplings are fairly large and the dumpling skins are made fresh.
The prawn dumplings are fairly large and the dumpling skins are made fresh.

“This is how we have been eating it since we were young, and our family recipe has never called for the dish to be too sour,” he said.

The eatery also has curry chicken wantan mee which was really flavourful and rich.

Ng serves the curry chicken and potatoes in a separate bowl to accompany the plain wantan noodles that are tossed in dark sauce.

For those who prefer their noodles to be drenched with the curry, feel free to just pour the whole bowl of curry onto the plate of noodles.

One other favourite in the shop is the signature char siew wantan mee and prawn dumplings.

“Quite a number of customers like the original wantan mee with char siew and we do get quite a lot of orders for it,” he said.

The prawn dumplings are pretty sizeable and packed with a tasty filling. Ng still makes the dumpling skins from scratch.

He also let us try the braised pork belly with black fungus, which comes in a separate bowl from the choice of noodles or rice.

Similar to the beef wantan mee, this dish is also only available on weekends and public holidays.

“We try not to keep the food we make, like the sauces and soup, overnight. We will dispose of the leftovers and make fresh batches the day before,” he said.

Ng at work in his shop.
Ng at work in his shop.

LONG SHENG FOOD SHOP, No 4, Jalan Rodat 2/KU5, Bandar Bukit Raja, Klang. (Tel: 019-350 3266). Business hours: 8.30am to 5pm daily, closed on first and 15th day of the lunar calendar. Non-halal.

This is the writer’s personal observation and is not an endorsement by StarMetro.

   

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