Iraq's Abadi struggles to gain Sunni tribal support


  • World
  • Thursday, 30 Oct 2014

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - When Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi took office, he was regarded as a moderate Shi'ite leader who could win over powerful Sunni tribal chiefs to the fight against Islamic State.

Three months later, Sunnis who once helped U.S. Marines kick the Islamic State's predecessor al Qaeda out of Iraq view Abadi with deep scepticism because he has yet to deliver on promises to support their neglected Sunni heartland Anbar province.

Limited time offer:
Just RM5 per month.

Monthly Plan

RM13.90/month
RM5/month

Billed as RM5/month for the 1st 6 months then RM13.90 thereafters.

Annual Plan

RM12.33/month

Billed as RM148.00/year

1 month

Free Trial

For new subscribers only


Cancel anytime. No ads. Auto-renewal. Unlimited access to the web and app. Personalised features. Members rewards.
Follow us on our official WhatsApp channel for breaking news alerts and key updates!
   

Next In World

Brazil's Bolsonaro rallies supporters in Rio
Five rockets fired from Iraq towards U.S. military base in Syria, security sources say
Rome celebrates 2,777th birthday with parade, events
Imperial Chinese wine jar stolen from Belgian museum
Heavy rains kill 4, affect thousands of IDPs in Yemen
Iran says ready to cooperate on environmental issues
AU extends condolences to victims of deadly boat disaster in Central African Republic
Hundreds gather on Sydney's Bondi Beach to mourn Westfield attack victims
South Korea protests Japanese leaders' offerings to Yasukuni shrine
Two dead, six injured in Memphis block party shooting, police says

Others Also Read