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As Nvidia expands in artificial intelligence, Intel defends turf

Nvidia Corp dominates chips for training computers to think like humans, but it faces an entrenched competitor in a major avenue for expansion in the artificial intelligence chip market: Intel Corp.

Nvidia, which posted an 89% rise in profit, hasn't given a specific estimate for the inference chip market but Huang (pic) said on an earnings call with analysts on Aug 16 that he believes it "is going to be a very large market for us". — Reuters

US judge blocks programs letting ‘Grand Theft Auto’ players ‘cheat’

A federal judge awarded Take-Two Interactive Software Inc, the maker of the 'Grand Theft Auto' series, a preliminary injunction to stop a Georgia man from selling programs that it said helps players cheat at the best-selling videogame.

Stanton said Take-Two was likely to show that Zipperer infringed its 'Grand Theft Auto V' copyright, and that his programs would cause irreparable harm to its sales and reputation by discouraging users from buying its videogames. — Reuters

Google employees demand more oversight of China search engine plan

Google's plan to launch a censored search engine in China requires more "transparency, oversight and accountability," hundreds of employees at the Alphabet Inc unit said in an internal petition.

The China petition says employees are concerned the project, code named Dragonfly, “makes clear” that ethics principles Google issued during the drone debate “are not enough”. — Reuters

Apple reassures customers after Australian media reports hack by teen

Apple Inc said no customer data was compromised after Australian media reported a teenager had pleaded guilty to hacking into its main computer network, downloading internal files and accessing customer accounts.

An Apple spokesman said the company's information security personnel "discovered the unauthorised access, contained it, and reported the incident to law enforcement" without commenting further on the specifics of the case. — Reuters

Uber’s new Brazil centre aims to improve safety of cash transactions

Ride-hailing company Uber Technologies Inc plans to open a 250mil reais centre in Brazil that will research technology to make it safer for its drivers to accept cash, a key payment method in its rapid expansion in Latin America, the company said.

Brazil is Uber's second-largest national market after the United States with 1 billion rides in the past four years and a profitable bottom line, according to executives. — Reuters

This is what your young school-age kid should know before going online

As soon as your kids begin to go online, it's important to explain your expectations of their behaviour.

Here are some basics to share with your child about going online. — Dreamstime/TNS

Goo-gle gaga: Parenting in the age of Alexa and her ilk

Hey parents: What if there was a machine that could respond to your kids’ every command, never tiring, even if they ask it to tell jokes for two hours or answer all their homework questions?

Even as Amazon and Google are adding options that control access and require kids to speak politely to their voice-controlled speakers, devices like the Echo Dot and Google Home can make a big and unexpected impact. — San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS

Google tracks your movements, like it or not

Google wants to know where you go so badly that it records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to.

A mobile phone displaying a user's travels in New York. Google records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to. — AP

For many kids, summer means powering down for camp

If teens are so attached to their phones and all things connected, why do so many of them wind up in no-device summer camps with smiles on their faces?

About 90% of the nearly 8,400 sleep away camps counted by the American Camp Association are now device free, though some allow limited time with screenless iPods and other Internet-free music players. — AP

Expert tips on how to limit screen time for kids

Evidence is growing that too much time in front of a screen can be bad for our eyes and our health in general, especially for children and teens.

Encouraging kids to avoid using electronic devices in the dark is one way to limit the potential damage caused by too much screen time. — AFP Relaxnews

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