Japan police probe Uber Eats for suspected breach of immigration law


An Uber Eats delivery person rides a bicycle during an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Shibuya shopping and amusement district in Tokyo, Japan April 8, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato/Files

TOKYO (Reuters) -Japanese police on Tuesday filed a notice of investigation against the local office of food delivery service Uber Eats for suspected breach of immigration law.

Tokyo Metropolitan Police sent a notice to the company and two former managers about alleged unauthorised work by Vietnamese nationals that took place from June to August 2020, a police spokesperson said, confirming a report from the Kyodo News Agency. No arrests were made, and the case was referred to prosecutors.

With a third of its population over 65, Japan has become increasingly reliant on foreign labour, but the ruling party has been reluctant to liberalise immigration policies.

An Uber spokesperson told Reuters the company was "fully cooperating" with authorities.

The company "has taken a number of steps to strengthen onboarding procedures for prospective couriers", the spokesperson said in a statement.

(Reporting by Chang-Ran Kim and Rocky Swift; editing by Jacqueline Wong and Jason Neely)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
Join our Telegram channel to get our Evening Alerts and breaking news highlights

   

Next In Tech News

Euro 2020 deliver record June ad revenue for ITV
How a grandpa’s death and lucrative Twitter handle sent US man to prison
Exclusive: Walmart's Flipkart asks India's top court to stall antitrust queries, probe
TotalEnergies to buy EV charging network in Singapore
Demand rises for tough phones
German app shakes up home grocery shopping with delivery in less than 10 minutes
"Durian Mustaqim" portrays reality on durian business
Adecco Group to buy AKKA Technologies in $2.4 billion deal
Nine new communication towers help improve internet access in Sabah
QuantumScape says it’s testing 10-layer solid-state battery cell

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers