SElangkah introduces cards to ease contact tracing for OKU


SElangkah is introducing a QR code which OKU users can print as a card to simplify the contact tracing registration when entering premises. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star

Contact tracing service SElangkah is introducing a QR code for the public, which store owners can scan to register the customer as they enter the premises.

Selangkah tweeted that the feature, called Selangkad, was meant as an inclusive solution for the differently abled (OKU), who may find it difficult to register themselves.

“We know it’s difficult for OKUs to operate a smartphone to scan a QR code. So we’re issuing a unique QR card for the OKUs, and the shop owners can scan their card whenever they visit a shop,” it explained.

The QR code would need to be printed onto a piece of paper to be used as a card, though users could also save the code as an image on their smartphone.

Typically shops are required to have a QR code which customers scan as they enter, or a physical logbook for customers to write their details in for contact tracing purposes.

However, as Selangkah noted, a QR code might be troublesome for OKU.

In replies to its tweets, Selangkah clarified that users can manage the card on behalf of family members who are OKU, though it did not confirm if the Selangkad was an option for senior citizens or those who were not technologically literate.

To register for a Selangkad, the public can contact them via this WhatsApp link or by messaging 014-302 5655.

First rolled out on May 4, SElangkah was meant as a measure to monitor the spread of Covid-19 infection in Selangor during the movement control order (MCO) period.

The state government assured that it would manage the data and make it accessible to health officers if new Covid-19 cases were recorded at a premise using the service.

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