Aliff Syukri and other controversial parents on social media


  • Tech News
  • Thursday, 02 May 2019

Celebrity businessman Datuk Aliff Syukri came under fire for an Instagram post in which he talks about caning his nine-year-old daughter. The flamboyant personality explains that he had to punish the little girl for removing her hijab in front of strangers.

In the video, Aliff seems to be applying healing cream on his daughter's back as she cries from the pain after being caned. The video posted on April 25 has received over 950,000 views with most comments voicing anger at Aliff's actions towards his child.

The Star reported that non-governmental organisation Protect and Save The Children (P.S. The Children), a member of the Child Rights Coalition Malaysia (CRCM) has lodged a police report against Aliff for physical abuse. 

"He publicly humiliated his child online by video recording himself applying medication to her wounded back while she appeared to be in distress, and uploaded the footage on his Instagram for his 3.1 million followers," CRCM said in a statement.

Aliff responded to the backlash with a video posted on April 30, in which he tells the public to mind their own business. The businessman even got his daughter to comment and she responded by saying "dad hit me for a reason ... (Abah pukul Adik sebab ada reason)". 

Well, Aliff is not the first parent to court controversies on social media.

In March this year, Arizona-based content creator Machelle Hobson was arrested for child abuse. She had allegedly starved and physically abused her seven children, from ages six to 15, as forms of punishments when they failed to perform for videos on the Fantastic Adventures YouTube channel.

YouTube deactivated the channel after news of Hobson's alleged mistreatment broke. Fantastic Adventures started in 2012 and had racked up more than 250 million views with over 800,000 subscribers.

Then in April, popular YouTube couple Cole and Savannah LaBrant were criticised for posting an April Fool's joke video involving their six-year-old daughter.

In the clip, the daughter was seen crying after Cole and Savannah announced that they will be giving her puppy away. Viewers described the prank as "cruel" and chastised the couple for subjecting the child to "psychological abuse". The video had 1.5 million views before it was removed from the channel.

In the same month, a video showing a mother kicking her child model daughter in China also went viral. The child, known as Niuniu, was in the midst of a photo-taking session for an e-commerce company on Taobao when the mother hit her. The incident prompted other Taobao sellers to voice their concern for the child on Chinese social media site Weibo.    

Taobao responded to the criticism by saying that the company would scale back on the use of child models on its site.

Back in 2018, YouTube removed the Maryland-based FamilyOFive channel from its platform after receiving complaints that the parents behind the videos were putting their children under extreme distress.

According to an article on news.com.au, the parents – Michael and Heather Martin – were seen shoving, screaming and abusing their five children in videos involving pranks.

US child services' investigation found that two of the youngest children – age 10 and 11 – suffered "mental injury" as a result of being involved in the prank videos for the channel. They have since been removed from their parents' custody. The channel had over 750,000 subscribers with videos that garnered close to 175 million views before it was banned by YouTube. 

Related stories:

Aliff Syukri’s child needs to be taken into protective custody

NGO lodges report against celebrity Aliff Syukri for caning his daughter

Aliff apologises for video but wife says daughter tends to be 'dramatic'


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