Burberry teams up with Google on personalised campaign videos


  • TECH
  • Thursday, 26 Nov 2015

Star in your own Burberry ad: "The Burberry Booth" powered by Google uses real-time video stitching technology to let customers appear alongside some of the Festive Film's cast members in a 15-second edit of its latest Billy Elliot-inspired campaign film.

Burberry has teamed up with Google to allow customers to star in their very own version of its festive campaign. 

"The Burberry Booth," which is powered by the tech giant, uses real-time video stitching technology to let clients appear alongside some of the Festive Film's cast members in a 15-second edit of its latest Billy Elliot-inspired campaign film. 

Clients are captured jumping in the style of the advert, before the footage is placed within the film itself. Once complete, the booth sends customers a copy of the movie that they can share and watch on YouTube. 

To coincide with the launch of booth, the brand has also released a short film on YouTube of its Festive campaign cast, including Naomi Campbell, James Corden and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley offering tips on how to jump using a trampoline. 

"The Burberry Booth" is located at the brand's flagship store, 121 Regent Street in London until Dec 24. — AFP Relaxnews 

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