New wearable provides two-in-one physical and emotional health tracking


  • TECH
  • Tuesday, 04 Nov 2014

EMOTIONAL PLAY: Inyu uses your pent-up feelings to control light, play games and others

Like many wearable health tracking devices already on the market, the Inner You (Inyu) measures heart rate, breathing rate, skin conductance and physical activity, but here's the catch: It uses that data to gauge emotion.

Since reading about how you feel on a digital screen is hardly a solution to overcoming difficult emotions, in what is likely to be a first-of-its-kind function, the device allows users to channel their emotions into controlling aspects of their environment.

In a video about the device, Srinivasan Murali, co-founder and chief executive officer of Switzerland-based parent company SmartCardia, says it will be possible to turn lights on and off in addition to moving certain types of objects using the device and those pent-up emotions.

The device wastes no data, allowing users to track their physical and emotional health stats to get in shape in more ways than one.

Murali expects to launch the device first in India starting in 2015, where he estimates it will cost 9,000 rupees (RM540).

Find out more: www.smartcardia.com/inyu

See a video demonstration: youtu.be/9xaV7z_kuIo

A similar stress-measuring wearable is called the Pip (RM745), which measures physiological bio-signals such as stress reactions at the skin level and heart rate much like the INYU.

It takes the data gathered to help users relieve stress through pre-loaded gamification activities. — AFP/RelaxNews 2014
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