Samsung says considers Hynix chips for its mobile products


SEOUL: Samsung Electronics Co is considering purchasing mobile memory chips from rival SK Hynix Inc for future products including its new flagship Galaxy S smartphone to be launched this month, J.K. Shin, head of Samsung's mobile business, said on Thursday.

A supply deal would be a boost to SK Hynix, which relies heavily on Apple Inc as a customer for its mobile dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips.

It also points to tightening chip supplies as mobile gadget makers prepare to upgrade their flagship product lines with greater variety and increased memory storage capacity.

Prices of mobile DRAM chips have increased steadily since early this year, reflecting a tightening supply outlook.

Samsung, the world's biggest maker of DRAM chips, has largely depended on internal supplies of memory chips for its Galaxy range of smartphones, but the market has expected it may also begin looking to outside chip suppliers to ensure no supply disruptions for key models of its Galaxy S smartphone.

The Galaxy S4, which will go on sale later this month, is expected to outsell its predecessors, with monthly sales of about 10 million, and could leapfrog past Apple's iPhone which recaptured the top spot in global smartphone sales in the fourth quarter, analysts said.

Shares in Hynix dropped 2.8% on Thursday as Apple suppliers were hit by concerns of weaker demand from the iPhone and iPad maker, after a disappointing revenue forecast by one of its suppliers.

Shares in LG Display Co, which makes flat screens for Apple's iPhone and iPad, tumbled 4.3%. — Reuters

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3

Samsung , Galaxy S , smartphones , S4 , SK Hynix

   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

Next In Tech News

Uber urges Hong Kong government to rethink clampdown, claiming livelihoods of 14,000 drivers at risk
Opinion: Threat of the digital giants and their unfettered trade monopolies
Google’s Messages app rolls out global support for successor to SMS
Contact lenses worthy of James Bond to zoom and film in a blink of an eye
Will remote working be the new norm in tomorrow’s world?
Facebook’s AI mistakenly bans ads for struggling businesses
HTTPS only: Firefox now blocks websites without encrypted connections
PlayStation 5 giveaways: Real deal, phishing or data scam?
For Big Tech, Biden brings a new era but no ease in scrutiny
Twitter has flagged 200 of Trump’s posts as ‘disputed’ or misleading since the US election day – does it make a difference?

Stories You'll Enjoy