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NTU shows off world's tiniest heart pump

RESEARCHERS in Singapore have produced the world's smallest heart pump.

Sciences key to exciting careers

STUDENTS are constantly being told that they would have a brighter future if they were to do Science. But which disciplne in Science should they opt for?

New interest in ancient crabs

Horseshoe have been around for more than 200 million years - they predate flying insects, dinosaurs and humans - but scientists know little about them. That is changing, now that the species is playing critical roles in assuring biomedical safety and in a major environmental dispute.

Singapore factory output declines unexpectedly

Singapore#8217;s factory production fell unexpectedly in February for the first time in four months, dropping 12% from January as pharmaceutical output slid, official data showed yesterday.

On the tail of a giant squid

B>F/B>. Gilly, a biology professor at Stanford University, in Palo Alto, California, is off to tag the wild Humboldt squid on the Sea of Cortes.

Going for the best

What do you do when your child is diagnosed as autistic? Clinical psychologist Dr TEOH HSIEN-JIN offers some pointers on types of intervention and evaluation of therapies available.

Expert sacked over 'unethical drug research'

THE head of Singapore#8217;s National Neuroscience Institute (NNI) has been sacked after an independent panel found him guilty of experimenting on patients without their consent.

Ethics and semantics of managing an epidemic

A WHILE ago, a friend asked me, what makes an epidemic take off? Mendacity, I replied, among other things.

Tissue engineering offers hope for replacement body parts

PEOPLE suffering from liver failure, heart attacks or worn knee joints often need replacement parts, and researchers around the world are working to develop artificial tissue so these patients can be helped.

The uncommon cold

When experts first heard of a respiratory disease spreading from person to person in Asia, there was fear that this could be the Big One that they had been dreading #8211; a re-run of the deadly 1918-1919 influenza epidemic that killed more than 20 million people around the world. Fortunately, this has proven unfounded, writes RAJEN M.