Put flood victims in other places


REFERRING to “Radzi: Schools identified for use as flood relief and voting centres” (The Star, Sept 23; online at https://bit.ly/3RfBdp8), schools should not be used as flood evacuation centres this time around because classes are still ongoing until February next year.

Even if only parts of the school premises, such as the hall, are used to put up flood victims, the learning environment would still be negatively affected.

Students would be distracted by the presence of the evacuees and places for their co-curricular activities would be taken up.

The situation could force the return of online classes as happened during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Students who will be sitting for their SPM or STPM exams in February or March next year require a conducive environment to concentrate on their preparations.

The Education Ministry should conduct the home-based Learning and Teaching (PdPR) programme for students in schools that are prone to flooding to ensure their education is not disrupted.

Students taking shelter at flood evacuation centres should be provided with proper rooms or space to attend virtual lessons.

Public places such as community halls, stadiums and unoccupied or empty shoplots/factories should be used as evacuation centres instead of schools now that the last term only ends in February.

TING LIAN LEE

Johor Baru

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