Why some motorists break the law


  • Letters
  • Thursday, 24 Jan 2019

PEOPLE break the law when they think they can get away with it. And when these law breakers get off scot-free, those who are law-abiding would feel a sense of “unfairness”.

The majority of Malaysian road users are law-abiding people. When they see fairness in enforcement, they will respect the law.

Unfairness may lead to some form of protest to “level up”, where people would think that if others can get away with breaking traffic rules, why not them.

Worse, it may lead to road snobbery where people think that since enforcement is weak, they would not be caught and reprimanded.

I would advise the enforcement authorities to enforce the law where it matters most – where it happens most in daily life – to serve as a lesson to others.

Do go the extra mile to nab and punish those who cut queue, beat the red light, tailgate, change lanes quickly without indicating, drive on emergency lanes, block the yellow boxes, double park and even those driving vehicles with extra bright lights. The local authority’s traffic wardens can complement the traffic police for this purpose.

These transgressions may not cause crashes and are often tagged as “a small matter” but they affect the majority of road users daily and cause a lot of anger among those who faithfully obey traffic rules while errant drivers do their worst.

Enforcement will nip the problem in the bud and instil a responsible attitude among all road users.

Above all, do not offer discount for fines as it is unfair to those who have paid theirs.

The majority of our road users are law-abiding citizens who expect fairness from the authorities.

When fairness is shown, they would obey the law out of respect and appreciation instead of fear.

The latter is for the habitual offenders who should be dealt with severely.

TAN SRI LEE LAM THYE

Kuala Lumpur


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