Asylum applications in EU last year up a third from 2020


FILE PHOTO: People fleeing Russia's military operation against Ukraine walk toward the Shehyni border crossing to Poland past cars waiting in line to cross the border, outside Mostyska, Ukraine, February 27, 2022. REUTERS/Thomas Peter/File Photo

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union received 648,000 applications last year for international protection, a third more than in 2020, its asylum agency EUAA said on Tuesday, with Syrians and Afghans the main groups of applicants.

In addition, the bloc received about 3.4 million requests for temporary protection from those fleeing conflict in Ukraine. The EUAA said altogether about 6 million people ran from the Russian invasion for the EU, though many have since returned.

Applications by Syrians and Afghans numbered 117,000 and 102,000 respectively, followed by nationals of Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey and Bangladesh, the agency said in a report. The main destinations were France, Germany, Italy and Spain.

Half of all applicants were aged between 18 and 34, while about 70% were male. Nearly three in ten applications came from minors and four percent of all requests were from unaccompanied minors.

The EU granted about 185,000 people asylum or subsidiary protection, with Eritreans securing the highest such rate, at 81%, and Georgians the lowest, at 3%. Nearly 770,000 decisions were still pending, the agency added.

(Reporting by Gabriela Baczynska; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Article type: free
User access status:
Subscribe now to our Premium Plan for an ad-free and unlimited reading experience!
   

Next In World

'Noone can stop them': African migrants aim for Spain's Canary Islands
Blinken visits Rwanda in testing moment for old U.S. ally Kagame
Fresh fears after Facebook’s role in US abortion case
'Extreme' weather warning in force in Britain as new heatwave hits
UK police charge 'IS Beatle' with terrorism offences
This artist uses AI to show how the world’s streets could be more pedestrian-friendly
Cisco hit by cyberattack from hacker linked to Lapsus$ gang
France battles 'monster' wildfire near Bordeaux for third day
UK prosecutor authorises terrorism charges against IS suspect
Cheaper, changing and crucial: the rise of solar power

Others Also Read