Bidens attend mass before final day of G7 summit


U.S. President Joe Biden and U.S. first lady Jill Biden leave after attending church, before the last day of the G7 summit, in St Ives, Britain, June 13, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

ST IVES, England (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden and his wife Jill went to church on Sunday morning before the final day of the Group of Seven summit in England, with his huge convoy of cars winding around the narrow lanes of Cornwall.

"Beautiful," the president said, as he later emerged into the sunshine from the small Catholic church, The Sacred Heart and St. Ia, that sits above the bay of St Ives, located on the tip of southwest England.

With police outriders leading the way, a convoy of 17 mostly large black vehicles with flashing lights made their way along the quiet, tiny lanes of the Cornish fishing village before arriving at the church.

After leaving mass, Biden escorted his wife to her own vehicle before he returned to his, heading for the summit in the nearby village of Carbis Bay.

The G7 summit is due to finish in the early afternoon on Sunday and the couple will then travel to Windsor Castle to have tea with Queen Elizabeth

(Reporting by Steve Holland; writing by Kate Holton; editing by Michael Holden)

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