Turkey has stopped insulting us, but action still needed, France says


FILE PHOTO: France's President Emmanuel Macron gestures next to Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan during a photo opportunity at the NATO leaders summit in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann/Pool/File Photo

PARIS (Reuters) - Turkey has stopped insulting France and the European Union, providing some reassurance, but ties will remain fragile until it takes concrete action, France's foreign minister said.

Ankara has repeatedly traded barbs with Paris over its policies on Syria, Libya, the eastern Mediterranean and other issues, but the NATO members said in February they were working on a road map to normalise relations.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan spoke with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday as part of those efforts.

"There aren't any more insults and the language is more reassuring," Jean-Yves Le Drian told a parliamentary hearing late on Tuesday.

He said that the removal of Turkish research vessels from Cypriot waters in the eastern Mediterranean and Ankara showing a desire to resume talks with Greece over a long-standing maritime dispute were positive signs.

"It's fragile, because the list of disagreements is very long, but we want a healthy relationship with Turkey," he said pointing to differences over Libya, Iraq and Nagorno-Karabakh.

"Actions are needed and we will be able to position ourselves when those actions are carried out. For now it's just verbal action," he said.

(Reporting by John Irish; Editing by Giles Elgood)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Next In World

Chad's veteran leader Deby targets sixth term in presidential vote
Mexico reports 2,192 new coronavirus deaths after data review
Benin votes for president after week of violent protests
The day before elections, Peru marks record COVID-19 deaths
France extends gap between mRNA vaccine shots to ramp-up rollout
Archbishop of Santiago Chile hospitalized after testing positive for COVID-19
Egypt, Sudan reject Ethiopian proposal for data sharing on Renaissance dam
South African variant can 'break through' Pfizer vaccine, Israeli study says
Venezuela paid $64 million to receive vaccines through COVAX - vice president
Djibouti's President Guelleh wins fifth term with 97% of votes

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers