U.S. focused on 'future conduct' of Saudi Arabia after Khashoggi sanctions, spokesman says


U.S. State Department Spokesman Ned Price speaks to reporters during a news briefing at the State Department in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2021. REUTERS/Tom Brenner/Pool

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States is focused on "future conduct" of Saudi Arabia and will expect Riyadh to improve its human rights record, a U.S. spokesman said on Monday, after Washington imposed sanctions on some Saudis for the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi but fell short of sanctions against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The United States on Friday declassified a report that said the crown prince approved an operation in 2018 to capture or kill Khashoggi and issued some sanctions against Saudi nationals and entities.

Washington's failure to penalize the crown prince has been criticized by rights groups and others, raising questions about accountability and the Biden administration's pledge to make human rights a foreign policy priority.

Prince Mohammed, the 35-year old de facto ruler, has denied any involvement in Khashoggi’s killing, for which eight people were jailed in Saudi Arabia last year, but has said he bears ultimate responsibility because it happened on his watch.

"We are very focused on future conduct and that is part of why we have cast this not as a rupture, but as a recalibration" of U.S.-Saudi relations, U.S. State Department spokesman Ned Price said at a press briefing.

"We are trying to get to the systemic issues underlying the brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi," Price said.

The United States welcomed the recent release of two human rights activists in Saudi Arabia, Price said, but asked Riyadh to do more by lifting the travel ban on them.

"We are urging Saudi Arabia to take additional steps – to lift travel bans on those released, to commute sentences and resolve cases such as those women’s rights activists and others," he said.

White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Monday that the United States reserved the right to sanction Mohammed bin Salman.

Khashoggi, a U.S. resident who wrote opinion columns for the Washington Post critical of the crown prince's policies, was killed and dismembered by a team of operatives linked to the prince in the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul in October 2018.

On Friday, the United States singled out the Rapid Intervention Force, or RIF, a unit of the Saudi royal guard that has engaged in counter dissident operations. It also issued visa bans on 76 Saudis.

Price said he could not disclose the names of the 76 people and declined to say whether or not Mohammed bin Salman was among them. The United States has urged Saudi Arabia to disband the RIF, Price added.

(Reporting by Humeyra Pamuk, Doina Chiacu, Daphne Psaledakis and Simon Lewis; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Grant McCool)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 46
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Next In World

Fears of vaccine exclusion as India uses digital ID, facial recognition
Analysis: India shifts from mass vaccine exporter to importer, worrying the world
Mexico charges 30 marines over forced disappearances in border city
'Run, Sara, Run': Is Duterte's daughter playing her father's game?
Colombia rules out prompt opening of Venezuela border on COVID concerns
JPMorgan says U.S.-sanctioned Russian bonds could be excluded from key indexes
North Korea's Kim visits family tomb to pay tribute to grandfather - KCNA
Brazil's Supreme Court confirms decision to annul Lula convictions
Past peak? Chile raises hopes vaccines, lockdowns are turning tide against COVID-19
Brazil in talks to import emergency COVID-19 medications amid shortages

Stories You'll Enjoy


Vouchers