More than half of Spaniards not willing to take COVID-19 vaccine immediately, survey shows


FILE PHOTO: People wearing face masks wait at the terrace of the Les Quinze Nits restaurant on Real square, after Spain's Catalonia region allowed bars, restaurants, gyms and cinemas to reopen from Monday, gradually easing some of the restrictions put in place to tackle the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Barcelona, Spain, November 23, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

MADRID (Reuters) - More than half of Spaniards are not willing to get COVID-19 vaccine shots as soon as they are available, a survey showed on Friday as the government announced a target of 15-20 million vaccinations by mid-2021.

Now several vaccines are in the works, one of the challenges for governments will be to convince a big enough share of their population to get vaccinated.

Even in Spain, where vaccination rates are usually high, this will be an issue, as shown by the official poll by the Centre for Sociological Studies (CIS).

About a third of the population would be ready to take the COVID-19 vaccine immediately, while 55.2% of them would rather wait to see any effects on others, the poll carried out on Nov. 23-26 amid 2,130 people, showed.

Out of the 55.2% of people who would rather wait, almost 60% would change their mind if their doctor recommended them to take it because they were at risk or putting their family members at risk, the survey showed.

Only 8.4% of Spaniards would refuse to take any sort of vaccine.

Spain last week unveiled its vaccination plan for when regulatory authorities give their approval. Vaccination will be free and voluntary, and is set to start in nursing homes in January.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said on Friday he expected to have between 15 and 20 million people to be vaccinated by May or June 2021. Spain has 47 million inhabitants.

In a prior CIS survey, carried out between Nov. 3 and 12, 36.8% said they would take the vaccine shot immediately, while 47.8% said they would not, though the question in that survey did not include the option of waiting for the effects to be known.

(Writing by Inti Landauro, Emma Pinedo and Ingrid Melander; Editing by Andrei Khalip and Alison Williams)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 18
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

100% readers found this article insightful

Next In World

Ambani’s Reliance Jio is doubling down to roll out 5G in 2021
Dutch police arrest alleged Asian drug syndicate kingpin
Australia has eye on vaccination drive even though coronavirus under control
Bernie Sanders’ mitten maker marvels over 15 minutes of fame
Trump asked Justice Department to go to Supreme Court to overturn election - Journal
Comment: Let Donald Trump run again
Russia wages online battle against TikTok and YouTube
Pakistani man killed during TikTok stunt on train track
My grandmother was named Kamala. And now, so is my vice president
Roundup: U.S. key COVID-19 metrics show decline this week

Stories You'll Enjoy