Russia's Sputnik COVID-19 vaccine to cost less than $20 per person internationally


FILE PHOTO: A woman holds a small bottle labeled with a "Coronavirus COVID-19 Vaccine" sticker and a medical syringe in front of displayed Russia flag in this illustration taken, October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia's Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine will cost less than $20 per person on international markets and Moscow aims to produce more than a billion doses at home and abroad next year, its backers and developers said on Tuesday.

The Sputnik vaccine is administered in two shots, each of which will cost less than $10 each, according to the official Sputnik V Twitter account. For Russian citizens, vaccination will be free of charge.

The pricing announcement comes as Russia looks to scale up distribution and production. Kirill Dmitriev, head of Russia's RDIF sovereign wealth fund, said Moscow and its foreign partners had capacity to make more than a billion doses starting from next year, enough to vaccinate over 500 million people.

The international market price for Sputnik V unveiled on Tuesday is cheaper than some other Western rivals such as a vaccine produced by Pfizer-BioNTech, which costs 15.5 euros per shot, but more expensive that a vaccine produced by AstraZeneca which will be sold in Europe for around 2.5 euros per shot.

Dmitriev told Reuters that Moscow had deliberately tried to get the price down to make it available to as many people around the world as possible.

RDIF said in a statement: "Sputnik V will be two or more times cheaper than mRNA vaccines with similar efficacy levels."

It said it was basing its assessment on mRNA vaccines where pricing had already been announced and interim phase three clinical trials were underway.

RDIF and the Gamaleya National Center said earlier on Tuesday that new clinical trial data based on 39 confirmed cases and 18,794 patients who got both shots had shown that Sputnik V was 91.4% effective on day 28 and over 95% effective on day 42.

Moscow has been criticised by some scientists in the West who have accused it of cutting corners in an effort to try to rush out the vaccine.

Russia has denied that, alleging a Western dirty tricks campaign to put people off its vaccine in what it believes has become a battle for legitimacy and market share.

(Reporting by Moscow newsroom; Editing by Nick Macfie)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 18
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

50% readers found this article insightful

Next In World

U.S. health secretary Azar resigns, cites Capitol attack - CNN
U.S. imposes fresh sanctions on Iran in final days of Trump presidency
Two U.S. military bases in South Korea shelter in place as coronavirus curbs extended nationwide
Mexico president backs dropping of drug case against ex-defense minister
Brazil airlifts emergency oxygen into pandemic-struck state, vaccine drive lags
India kicks off 'world's largest' vaccination campaign
Factbox: German conservative contenders to succeed Merkel as chancellor
End of Merkel era begins as German CDU picks new party leader
U.S. state of Illinois confirms first case of new COVID-19 variant
Tunisian police clash with protesters after police beating

Stories You'll Enjoy