Japan hasn't decided to ease entry ban, foreign minister says


  • World
  • Monday, 15 Jun 2020

FILE PHOTO: Japan's Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi arrives for a trilateral meeting with South Korea's Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo during the 56th Munich Security Conference (MSC) in Munich, southern Germany, February 15, 2020. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool via REUTERS

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi said on Monday it was not true the government had decided to ease an entry ban, which was implemented to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus, for people from certain countries.

The Yomiuri daily reported last week that Japan may restart business trips to and from Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam and Thailand in the next few months.

The government is examining ways to ease entry bans, taking into consideration various factors comprehensively, and would ease restrictions in stages if it decided to do so, Motegi told parliament.

Motegi has agreed with his counterparts from Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand to discuses the possibility of re-allowing travel to those who need it, he said.

(Reporting by Kaori Kaneko; Editing by Chris Gallagher)

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

Next In World

Children in Brazil found working for food delivery apps
Google’s co-head of ethical AI says she was fired for email
Report: Facebook changing ‘race-blind’ hate speech policy
Google set to win EU approval for Fitbit takeover next week
Healthcare workers, nursing homes in U.S. Dallas County to receive COVID-19 vaccines in December
U.S. Houston mayor asks people to get tested for COVID-19 after holiday
Spotlight: U.S. hits record-high COVID-19 daily cases, hospitalizations as caseload tops 14 mln
France declares national day of mourning for late president Valery Giscard d'Estaing
Brazil gets Chinese COVID-19 vaccine doses, Senate OK's British vaccine funding
U.S.-listed Chinese firms trade mostly higher

Stories You'll Enjoy