Discovery of 'Murder Hornet' in U.S. Pacific Northwest worries agriculture officials


  • World
  • Tuesday, 05 May 2020

WASHINGTON (Reuters): Hundreds of Asian giant hornets, an invasive, predatory insect dubbed the "murder hornet," have turned up in Washington state near the Canadian border, where they pose a threat to humans and the beekeeping industry, state agriculture officials said on Monday.

The stinging Vespa mandarinia can grow as large as 2-1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in length and is native to Southeast Asia, China and Taiwan. It was first discovered in Blaine, Washington, in December by a homeowner, according to Sven-Erik Spicheger, managing entomologist at the Washington state Agriculture Department.

"An Asian giant hornet can sting you multiple times and deliver larger doses of venom just because of the size of them. The venom itself is fairly toxic and creates localized necrosis around the wound so you'll see melting flesh around the wound," Spicheger told Reuters.

"What we're told from the literature is that most people can survive one or two stings," he said. "But if you sustain multiple stings, the necrosis and the venom will actually start getting into your bloodstream and will start working on your organs. And multiple stings could literally be fatal."

Aside from the danger to humans, the Murder Hornet presents a danger to agriculture and the apiary industry, Spicheger said, because the insect is known to attack honey bees, with a few of the hornets capable of wiping out an entire hive in hours.

"The hornets enter a 'slaughter phase' where they kill bees by decapitating them. They then defend the hive as their own, taking the brood to feed their own young," according to the Washington state Department of Agriculture website.

"Pollination is a huge part of agriculture and the agricultural systems we have here in the United States. And so if this were to become well-established and then start spreading, it could be pretty catastrophic," Spicheger said.

Scientists don't know for sure how the Murder Hornet made its way to Blaine. The most likely scenario is that it arrived on a container ship docking at one of Washington's ports. Intentional transport of the killer bug into the United States would violate federal law.

Following the discovery of the first hornet, a web page set up by Washington state agriculture officials to report additional sightings of the insect has received several hundred reports, Spicheger said.

Anyone coming across a nest should immediately alert authorities. While the hornets do not generally target people or pets, they can attack when threatened.

"We really don't want any private citizen trying to mess with an Asian giant hornet nest. Typical beekeeping attire will simply not protect you. The stinger on this insect is six millimeters long and will go readily through most clothes," Spicheger said. – Reuters

Article type: metered
User Type: anonymous web
User Status:
Campaign ID: 1
Cxense type: free
User access status: 3
   

Did you find this article insightful?

Yes
No

86% readers found this article insightful

Next In World

Pope urges more nations to join U.N. treaty banning nuclear weapons
Biden begins presidency as Trump ended his - with a sharp focus on immigration
Massive security phalanx aims to shield Biden inauguration from mob, 'lone wolf' threats
Factbox: Here's how Biden plans to roll back Trump's immigration policies
Factbox: Biden plans to reverse Trump policies during first days in office
Biden set to rejoin Paris climate accord, impose curbs on U.S. oil industry
Biden to assume U.S. presidency amid deep divisions, raging pandemic
Zimbabwe's foreign minister dies after contracting COVID-19
Nigerian restaurants struggle as inflation compounds pandemic impact
Tencent’s WeChat doubled commerce on mini programs in 2020

Stories You'll Enjoy