Cyber bullying, star suicides: The dark side of South Korea's K-pop world


  • World
  • Thursday, 28 Nov 2019

Students attend a cyber bullying prevention class by the National Police Agency in Seoul, South Korea, November 27, 2019. Picture taken on November 27, 2019. REUTERS/Won Chae-youn NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES

SEOUL (Reuters) - The apparent suicide of a second K-pop artist in a month has cast renewed focus in South Korea on vicious personal attacks and cyber bullying of vulnerable young stars, and how it mostly goes unpunished.

The police consider cyber violence a serious crime and have an active programme educating the public how not to fall prey to online attacks, or to become the perpetrator.

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