Japan to set rules for drones


  • Japan
  • Monday, 14 Jan 2019

Water wonderful invention: An underwater drone being showcased at the Las Vegas Convention Centre during CES 2019. — AFP

Tokyo: The government plans to draw up guidelines for underwater drones by fiscal 2020, reflecting the need for rules to prevent accidents as the use of such vehicles by the private sector is expected to increase, according to sources.

Underwater drones, also called unmanned submarines, are used for such purposes as checking offshore wind power plants and underwater pipelines.

The vehicles, with electric motors, move under preset programmes, collect data and send it to mother ships and base stations through communications using light or sound waves. Underwater drones are also utilised for collecting data on seabeds and their geological features. There are remote-controlled models as well.

In Japan, entities such as Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., IHI Corp and government research bodies are developing underwater drones, utilising their know-how cultivated through developing submarines.

Mainstay models are 2m to 3m long. Some models can dive to depths of several thousand metres.

Underwater research is usually conducted by divers, or by sinking equipment connected to cables. It is estimated that the cost of checking underwater pipelines can be cut to one-third by using drones.

According to the Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ministry, the market for underwater drones is expected to reach about US$1.2bil (RM4.9bil) in 2023, up from about US$200mil (RM818mil) in 2010.

However, trouble is anticipated if the use of underwater drones increases, such as collisions with ships and underwater facilities, or drones becoming lost under the sea.

To deal with such situations, the infrastructure ministry plans to draw up guidelines for measures to prevent accidents, and to deal with them when they do take place.

For example, the guidelines will require makers to install mechanisms to avoid collisions, and to collect drones once their batteries become depleted. — The Nation/Asia News Network

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