When the landlord is the caterer and guardian too


RETIRED teacher Alene Tan, 56, and her businessman husband Roger Tan, 60, have often thought of moving to a smaller flat since their two children moved overseas. 

Now, though, they may not do so. The couple, who live in a four-bedroom condominium, hope to have it filled with young people again – foreign students this time. 

Under a new scheme for condos and private homes, Singaporeans, particularly professionals, are being encouraged to rent out rooms to these youths, providing them with food and laundry services, and acting as their guardians. 

The Association of Management Corporations in Singapore (Amcis) and the Singapore Tourism Board (STB), which are behind the idea, believe it will give Singapore the edge in attracting students from overseas, as it will guarantee suitable accommodation and someone trustworthy looking after them. 

Amcis and STB envision the hosts charging each student between S$700 (RM1,540) and S$1,100 (RM2,420) a month, about the price at a private hostel. – The Straits Times/Asia News Network

For another perspective from The Straits Times, a partner of Asia News Network, click here.

 

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