Foreign car owners yet to get RFID tag


JOHOR BARU: Many owners of foreign-registered cars are lamenting they have yet to receive their RFID (radio frequency identification) tag even as Malaysia’s Vehicle Entry Permit (VEP) system will start on Oct 1.

Their concern stems from the fact that there are only ten days left before Malaysia makes it compulsory for these vehicles to have the RFID tag when entering to show they have registered for the VEP.

Linked to the Touch ‘n’ Go platform, the RFID tag is also designed to help motorists pay for Malaysia’s road charge, which is currently at RM20 per car per entry.

The RFID-based system was also meant to tackle car theft and cloning syndicates, while also preventing vehicles with outstanding fines from leaving Malaysia.

Many motorists have expressed their frustration with the process of getting the RFID tags, including Malaysians who own Singapore-registered vehicles.

They complain about the long queues, problems in setting up appointments and difficulties when making enquiries on some of the issues plaguing the implementation of the system.

There are four areas in Johor where the car owners may install their RFID tags once they set an appointment online: Pandan RnR, Gelang Patah Southbound RnR, Plaza Angsana Open Car Park C and Lima Kedai Toll Plaza.

The processing fee is RM10 for the VEP application and RFID tag, which is typically mounted on the upper side of the windscreen.

A Singaporean clerk who only wanted to be known as Ong, 38, said she had registered in early August but had yet to be notified of the date and location where she could have the RFID tag installed.

“I have tried to call the helpline and dropped several emails to the Malaysian authorities, but have yet to receive any response.

“I hope to get an answer before October as I do not want to get a fine when I cross the Causeway next month, ” she said at the Pandan RnR RFID installation centre.

She said this was the fourth time she had dropped by here to follow up on the collection date and venue.

However, those who registered could only have the RFID installed at either of these locations upon receiving a link from the Road Transport Department (JPJ), where they could then book an appointment.

Singaporean civil servant Jordan Low, 30 who finally received his RFID tag here after a lengthy process, said he was glad that he managed to complete the process before October.

“It was a relief as a lot of my family members and friends are still waiting to book a slot, ” he said, adding that most, if not all, of the appointment slots for this month are fully booked.

Singaporean bank officer Marcus Tan, 31 said his experience in obtaining the RFID tag was fairly smooth.

“I did not experience much hassle in registering and I got the confirmation email as well as notification on when I could pick up my RFID just a few days after registering.

“However, not everyone I know had it easy as some have yet to be notified of the date and location for their appointment despite registering earlier than me, while some are having issues with registering via the website, ” he said.

State JPJ director Razali Wagiman said those who have yet to receive their RFID device could use their confirmation slip for the time being.

“They do not have to rush as they can still use the confirmation slip they have received upon registering for now, and we will not penalise them for that.

“However, they must at least register first on the JPJ website before October, ” he said, adding that registration has been extended until the end of December.


   

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